Providing a culturally competent school counseling

  • Liberty University
  • EDCE 660
  • Essay
  • TorisMommy
  • 13
  • 100% (13) 13 out of 13 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 10 - 13 out of 13 pages.

Providing a culturally competent school counseling program is one that relies on collaboration with many stakeholders. The professional school counselor should be prepared to offer resources to individuals and families outside of the school setting. This could include referrals to mental health professionals, tutoring options, spiritual/religious groups, information about LGBTQ communities, and options for English as a second language learners (ASCA, 2004). Erford (2019) cites Holcomb-McCoy’s social justice framework to challenge achievement inequities. This framework includes 6 components: counseling and planning interventions; consulting; connecting schools, families, and communities; collecting data and identifying inequities; challenging biases; and coordinating student services. If each of these areas is emphasized in the comprehensive school counseling program the professional school counselor is working from a social justice perspective. One thing my friends have always said about me is that they love my ability to love unconditionally and without restraint. Even when I have been hurt, I still open to that person and allow second chances. This includes my liberal stance and openness to those that differ from me. While I do qualify myself as a Christian and attend services twice weekly, I tend to be more liberal than most. I try to live my life from Philippians 1:21, “To live is Christ and to die is
gain.” I consider this my life verse. To live is Christ to me means that we act as Jesus did. We befriend the person that Jesus would have. We eat with the tax collectors and prostitutes. I am certainly not perfect and would never profess to be, but I do try to be Christ like. So, rather than condemn those different from myself, I embrace them. I believe this puts me in a very good position to be a multicultural/social justice advocate. For the most part I am justice oriented already, but I have much to learn. I just believe I am already on the road to becoming an advocate for students, who much like myself, were denied opportunities for academic success. I am encouraged by the new role of professional school counselor. The changes being made in education to provide diverse students with opportunities, that they otherwise may not have been afforded, are steps in the right direction. I look forward to being able to learn new skills and apply them to help our next generation succeed in whatever direction they would like to go.
References (n.d.). Retrieved from AACC Law and Ethics Committee. (2014). American Association of Christian Counselors: AACC Code of Ethics. Retrieved February 26, 2019, from - content/uploads/2017/10/AACC-Code-of-Ethics-Master-Document.pdf American Counseling Association (ACA). (2019). About ACA. Retrieved March 2, 2019, from American School Counselors Association, ASCA. (2004). The ASCA National Model: A framework for school counseling programs. Retrieved March 1, 2019, from .

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture