Using the map below she sees shed have to walk 3 avenues long blocks and 8

Using the map below she sees shed have to walk 3

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Using the map below, she sees she'd have to walk 3 avenues (long blocks) and 8 streets (short blocks). In terms of the given numbers, she computed 3 as the difference between 7 and 10, *in absolute value*, and 8 similarly. # # Chunhua also knows that blocks in Manhattan are all about 80m by 274m (avenues are farther apart than streets). So in total, she'd have to walk $(80 \times | 42 - 34| + 274 \times |7 - 10|)$ meters to get to the park. # # <img src="map.jpg" alt="visual map about distance calculation"/> # # **Question 3.1.1.** <br /> Finish the line `num_avenues_away = ...` in the next cell so that the cell calculates the distance Chunhua must walk and gives it the name `manhattan_distance`. Everything else has been filled in for you. **Use the `abs` function.**
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# In[31]: # Here's the number of streets away: num_streets_away = abs(42-34) # Compute the number of avenues away in a similar way: num_avenues_away = abs(7-10) street_length_m = 80 avenue_length_m = 274 # Now we compute the total distance Chunhua must walk. manhattan_distance = street_length_m*num_streets_away + avenue_length_m*num_avenues_away # We've included this line so that you see the distance # you've computed when you run this cell. You don't need # to change it, but you can if you want. manhattan_distance # Be sure to run the next cell to test your code. # In[32]: check('tests/q311.py') # ##### Multiple arguments # Some functions take multiple arguments, separated by commas. For example, the built-in `max` function returns the maximum argument passed to it. # In[33]: max(2, -3, 4, -5) # ## 4. Understanding nested expressions # Function calls and arithmetic expressions can themselves contain expressions. You saw an example in the last question: # # abs(42-34) # # has 2 number expressions in a subtraction expression in a function call expression. And you probably wrote something like `abs(7-10)` to compute `num_avenues_away`. # # Nested expressions can turn into complicated-looking code. However, the way in which complicated expressions break down is very regular. # # Suppose we are interested in heights that are very unusual. We'll say that a height is unusual to the extent that it's far away on the number line from the average human height. [An estimate] (;) of the average adult human height (averaging, we hope, over all humans on Earth today) is 1.688 meters. # # So if Aditya is 1.21 meters tall, then his height is $|1.21 - 1.688|$, or $.478$, meters away from the average. Here's a picture of that: #
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