Due to commercialization of sugary foods and drinks

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susceptible to the dangers of obesity, including the wealthier socioeconomic class. Due to commercialization of sugary foods and drinks, many of the higher class citizens purchase name brand products that may or may not be healthy for them. One common mistake that these families make are purchasing sugary drinks. Sugar is known to be a very addictive and malnutritious substance when consumed regularly, and overconsumption is one of the leading factors to obesity. The consumption of soda is a prime example of how Americans overeat sugar, and can be seen in all socioeconomic statuses. However, in higher socioeconomic classes, families tend to steer away from soda and purchase higher quality, name brand juices, believing that it is healthier for them and their children. The issue with this is many of these name brand juices contain almost as much, sometimes more, sugar than soda, and is concealed by commercialized labels that make them seem healthy. Most common labels express these sugary juices as “made with real fruit juice” and “natural flavoring”, completely masking the chemicals and sugar that went in to most of the juice. With families unknowingly purchasing these sugary juices and feeding them to their children, it can also be seen that more and more children are becoming obese due to their environmental upbringing. It’s important to recognize that obesity absolutely does not discriminate. However, it has been shown that lower socioeconomic statuses indicate higher rates of obesity. There is a distinct correlation between hours worked and average waist size/BMI. First of all, in order to understand the relation between longer working hours, obesity, and socioeconomic status, it is important to understand the demographics and statistics of average hours worked amongst different socioeconomic levels. Studies from the University of North Carolina found that the average middle class american works approximately 40 hours per week, whereas lower class Americans
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Emerson, Jones, McArthur, Robards, Siddiqui, 5 work on average 49 or more hours per week. Also important to note is that this same study found that on average, minorities in the same socioeconomic status (Hispanic and Black Americans) worked more hours than their white counterparts - 9.4 more hours for Black Americans and 7.2 more hours for Hispanic Americans. This correlation between hours worked and socioeconomic status may shed some light on findings from Monash University in Melbourne, who found that most low-paying jobs would require longer hours to support a family, and are often not very physically demanding jobs: such as fast food work, transportation (trucking, busing, taxi driving), and factory labor. On average, adults who worked 49 or more hours per week were far more likely to be overweight (about 30%) than adults who worked regular hours (35-40 hours) (Hollingsworth). This combination of low paying and physically less demanding jobs creates a lack of time that prevents many workers from being able to buy, prepare, and cook healthy and lower-calorie meals at home - which ends up in a higher overall calorie count per day (Courtemanche). Also importantly, a Hong Kong study of urban working women found that
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