Functionally we can divide this system into two components Natural immunity

Functionally we can divide this system into two

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Functionally, we can divide this system into two components. Natural immunity Barriers and relatively nonspecific responses. Acquired immunity. Highly specific learned responses. o Physical barriers The Skin and surface fluids. o Inflammation Non-specific response to injury It involves the blood vessels of any tissue in the body. It can be triggered by any injury. Bee sting to bullet wound to myocardial infarction. o Natural Killer Cells A watchdog in natural immunity. o Acquired Immunity Acquired immunity is necessary because of the defense strategies adopted by infectious agents. This system is comprised of bone marrow derived cells. Monocyte/macrophage lineage Lymphoid cells T & B cells originate in the bone marrow. B cells continue development in the bone marrow. T cells leave the bone marrow to continue development in the thymus. At the proper stage of maturation, these cells wander through the body. They are searching for microbial “enemies” and when they spot them, they inform other immune cells. o They are looking for molecules foreign to our body. The foreign molecules are called antigens . Antigens are molecules associated with microbes, foreign cells and anything else that does not belong in the body. o B Lymphocytes and their Role in Immunity o Ultimately, B lymphocytes differentiate into plasma cells. Plasma cells produce antibodies. Antibodies are globular proteins (immunoglobulin) that react with (bind to) specific antigens.
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They are like receptor molecules for which one small portion of an antigen (an epitoph) is their ligand. B cells usually don’t work alone. B cells usually internalize and process antigen, then present the antigen to T cells , which become activated and help the B cell to mount its response. Some B-cells turn into memory cells after being expose to foreign bacteria, viruses or particles. Memory cells are long-lived, and maintain a molecular memory of the event. If the same antigen is encountered again, they will generate a more specific and rapid response. This is the principle behind vaccination. o Vaccination allows your immune system to interact with non-pathogenic forms of antigens. Memory cells are generated by this encounter. If the pathogenic form is later encountered, a rapid and effective response can be initiated.
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  • Spring '14
  • MarkSchlueter
  • cells, red blood cells, blood cells—immune cells

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