In some ways owens ideals align with the biblical

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In some ways Owen’s ideals align with the Biblical worldview, and in other ways, they do not. Owen strived to create a sense of community and connection with the greater good in mind. The Biblical world view also serves to create a sense of community and belonging amongst those that seek and follow Christ. Additionally, Owen’s believed that social issues, such as theft, drunkenness, and delinquency could be solved by character education. The Biblical world view also believes in education in moral character. On the other hand, Owen’s Utopian ideals addressed happiness. He believed that happiness for all was important, and the way to get to happiness was by way of character education. The Biblical world view doesn’t necessarily subscribe to the pursuit of happiness. The Biblical worldview is the idea that there is a bigger purpose to life than happiness. Happiness should be forgotten and is irrelevant (Gutek, 2011. p. 246-261; Moreland, 2007. P. 17-88). References Gutek, G. L. (2011). Historical and philosophical foundations of education: A biographical introduction (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Moreland, J. P. (2007). Kingdom triangle: Recover the Christian mind, renovate the soul, restore the Spirit’s power. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.
I really appreciated your comments regarding the philosophies of Owen as perceived through a Biblical worldview. While Owen did see students in a more individualistic way than Mill, it seems that both men were missing an important reality regarding the pursuit of truth and morality through Biblical instruction as opposed to their pursuit of individual or societal happiness. This pursuit of self-satisfaction at the expense of seeking to serve others and developing good character leads to what J.P. Moreland refers to as a widespread culture full of empty or false selves who are incapable of personal spiritual growth (Moreland, 2007). Through the reading and your post, I saw several similarities between the philosophies of John Stuart Mill and Robert Owen. Both men saw the potential harm posed by the Industrial Revolution and the growing disparity between the classes as this societal shift impacted education. Both men believed change was necessary and that the key to social change was found, not in revolution, but rather in education (Gutek, 2011). However, their approaches differed greatly when regarding individual freedom. Both men’s educational structures demonstrated a belief that education was not a one-size-fits-all approach as was often the case in classically-styled education of the time. In Owen’s case, this impact can be seen in the child-centered learning environment and for Mill the inclusion of fine arts instruction. However, Mill prioritized individual choice in as much as it led to the happiness of the majority, while Owen felt that individual rights were less important when contrasted with what he considered to be the best interest of the individual regardless of that individual’s personal desires (Gutek, 2011).

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