Guidelines on occupational safety and health in

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Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health in Construction Industry (Management) 2017gives further guidance on the requirements relating to pre-construction information. Appendix 3 shows how pre-construction information relates to and influences other types of information during a construction project involving more than one contractor. Eliminating, reducing or controlling foreseeable risks through design67 When designing, a designer should consider the risks people may be exposed to through the course of both constructing a building and using it once it is constructed. Designing is a process that often continues throughout the project and the following questions should be considered when design is carried out: (a) Can I get rid of the problem (or hazard) altogether? For example, can air-conditioning plant on a roof be moved to ground level, so work at height is not required for either installation or maintenance? (b) If not, how can I reduce or control the risks, so that harm is unlikely or the potential consequences less serious? For example, can I place the plant within a building on the roof, or provide a barrier around the roof? 68 If risks cannot be eliminated altogether, a designer should apply the principles below in deciding how to reduce or control the remaining risks – if possible, in the following order: (a) provide a less risky option, for example, switch to using paving lighter in weight, to reduce musculoskeletal disorders such as back problems; (b) make provisions so the work can be organised to reduce exposure to hazards, for example, make provision for traffic routes so barriers can be provided between pedestrians and traffic; (c) ensure that those responsible for planning and managing the work are given the information they will need to manage remaining risks, for example, tell them about loads that will be particularly heavy or elements of the building that could become unstable. This can be achieved through providing key information on drawings or within models, for example, by using Building Information Modelling (BIM) (see Example 4).
20Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health in Construction Industry (Management) 2017See paragraphs 8283 for further guidance on the ways of controlling risks. 69 When addressing risks, a designer is expected to do as much as is reasonable at the time the design is prepared. Risks that cannot be addressed at the initial stage of a project may need to be reviewed later on during detailed design. As the design progresses and design decisions become more fine-tuned and detailed, there are still opportunities for either eliminating or minimising risks. At various points in the design process, designers should review design solutions to confirm the effectiveness of risk controls and if necessary, redesign to minimise the risks so far as is reasonably practicable. Wherever possible, design safety reviews should involve the people who will eventually construct the structure. If this is not possible, the client and designer

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