Course Hero Logo

Photo taken from lucent technologies incbell labs

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 5 - 8 out of 15 pages.

Photo taken from:LucentTechnologies Inc./Bell Labs,courtesy AIP Emilio Segrè VisualArchives
explained by diffraction. One was left unexplained, and they failed to find eightadditional peaks that they had expected to appear.The team published a short paper inNaturein early 1927 and then a morecomplete article later that year in thePhysical Review. George Paget Thomson ofthe University of Aberdeen in Scotland published his own experimental proof ofelectron diffraction just a month later and shared the 1937 Nobel Prize in physicswith Davisson.Richard Feynman's Double-slit ExperimentIn Feynman's double-slit thought-experiment, a specific material is randomlydirected at a wall which has two small slits that can be opened and closed at will --some of the material gets blocked and some passes through the slits, depending onwhich ones are open. Based on the pattern that is detected beyond the wall on abackstop -- which is fitted with a detector --one can discern whether the materialcoming through behaves as either a waveor particle.When particles are fired at the wallwith both slits open, they are more likely tohit the backstop in one particular area,whereas waves interfere with each otherand hit the backstop at a number ofdifferent points with differing strength,creating what is known as an interferencepattern.In 1965, Feynman popularizedthat electrons -- historically thought to beparticles -- would actually produce the pattern of a wave in the double-splitexperiment. Unlike sound waves and water waves, Feynman highlighted that whenelectrons are fired at the wall one at a time, an interference pattern is still produced.He went on to say that this phenomenon "has in it the heart of quantum physics butin reality, it contains the only mystery."Young’s Double-slit Experiment and Other ExperimentsIn 1801 Thomas Young provided the first experimental evidence for the wavetheory of light from double slit interference experiment. Young’s double-slitexperiment explains the interference of light by making an analogy with theinterference of water waves. Two waves are generated at the positions of two slits inan opaque screen. The waves have the same wavelengths. They travel from theirorigins at the slits to the viewing screen placed to the right of the slits. The wavesRichard Feynman’s famous double-slitthought-experimentImage:3/feynmansdoub.png
meet on the viewing screen. At the positions marked “Max” on the screen, themeeting waves are in-phase and the combined wave amplitude is enhanced. Atpositions marked “Min,” the combined wave amplitude is zero. For light, thismechanism creates a bright-and-dark fringe pattern on the viewing screen.A similar dichotomy existed in the interpretation of electricity. From BenjaminFranklin’s observations of electricity in 1751 until J.J. Thomson’s discovery of theelectron in 1897, electric current was seen as a flow in a continuous electric medium.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 15 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
Electron, Test, Louis de Broglie, Clinton J Davisson

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture