Person weighing 130 pounds would need to take in at least 1300 calories 130 x

Person weighing 130 pounds would need to take in at

This preview shows page 9 - 12 out of 63 pages.

Person weighing 130 pounds would need to take in at least 1,300 calories (130 x 10 = 1,300) every day, just to meet their body’s basic needs. A person weighing 200 pounds would need to take in at least 2,000 calories (200 x 10 = 2,000). After you figure out your most basic caloric need, you can factor in your activity level and digestion needs. 1. Take your body weight in pounds and multiply this by 10. Example: 130 pounds x 10 calories/pound = 1,300 calories 2. To factor in the amount of activity you do in a regular day, take the number you just calculated and multiply it by your Activity Level: Example: 1,300 calories x .30 = 390 calories 3. Add together your BMR and calories burned by your activity level: Example: 1,300 calories + 390 calories = 1,690 4. Add in calories used during digestion – typically 10% for general population: Example: 1,690 calories + 169 calories (1,690*.10) = 1,859 1,859 calories are burned on average for a 130 lbs person every day for basic needs. Activity Level Calc Description Sedentary 20% Sitting most of the day Lightly Active 30% Walking here and there; daily chores Moderately Active 40% Constantly moving around; daily exercise Very Active 50% Heavy exercise for prolonged periods of time, such as training for a sport
Image of page 9

Subscribe to view the full document.

What humans actually need – the basics Description and comments The calculations of calorie requirements are based on the Harris Benedict formula who published his results more than 85 years ago. The formula goes like this: For women: BMR = 655 + ( 9.6 x weight in pounds ) + ( 1.7 x height in inches ) - ( 4.7 x age in years ) x Activity level For men: BMR = 66 + ( 13.7 x weight in pounds ) + ( 5 x height in inches ) - ( 6.8 x age in year ) x Activity level The Activity level is based on the amount of exercise you get, and varies from 1.2 to 1.8 or perhaps as high as 2.0, depending on what source you look at. From a statistical point of view, there are a lot of problems with this formula. Too many significant digits. Multiplying your height in inches by 1.7, instead of, say, 2, is a little silly when you can't measure your height to within more than half an inch or so. The significant digit problem is much worse when you consider that the Activity level is a rough guess at best, and affects the result much more strongly than any of the other variables. For example, changing your age by 10 years only changes the calorie requirement by 68 calories, while changing your Activity level estimate from 1.2 to 1.4 causes about a 300 calorie change. The formula makes no allowance for differences in metabolism between one person and another, or even from one time to another for the same person. So, 'estimate' is an important word to remember here. The charts were drawn for a 40 year old person of average height (5'9" for men, 5'4" for women).
Image of page 10
What humans actually need – the basics So, for a 30-year-old woman weighing 130 pounds (59.09 kg) and standing 5’6” tall (167.64 cm), her BMR, using the Harris-Benedict Equation, would be: 655 + (9.6 x 59.09) + (1.7 x 167.64) - (4.7 x 30) = 1,366 calories You will notice that this number, 1,366 calories, is very close to the number we
Image of page 11

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 12

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes