These and other styles reflect a number of

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These and other styles reflect a number of psychological dimensions including how decision makers  perceive what is happening around them and how they process information. A simple 2X2 behavioral decision-making style matrix can be categorized into two dimensions: value orientation and tolerance for ambiguity. The value orientation focuses on the decision maker’s  concern for task and technical matters as opposed to people and social concerns. The tolerance for  ambiguity orientation measures how much the decision maker needs structure and control (a desire  for low ambiguity) as opposed to being able to thrive in uncertain situations (a desire for high  ambiguity). These two orientations with their low and high dimensions are portrayed with  four styles of decision making : directive, analytical, conceptual, and behavioral. 1. 1.      Directive Style : Decision makers with a directive style have a low tolerance for  ambiguity and are oriented toward task and the technical concerns. These decision makers  tend to be efficient, logical, pragmatic, and systematic in their approach to problem solving.  Directive decision makers also like to focus on facts and get things done quickly. They also  are action oriented, tend to have a very short-run focus, like to exercise power, want to be in  control, and, in general, d isp lay an autocratic  Leadership Style .        
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2 Analytical Style : Analytical decision makers have a high tolerance for ambiguity and a strong  task and technical orientation. These types like to analyze situations; in fact, they often tend to  overanalyze things. They evaluate more information and alternatives than do directive decision  makers. They also take a long time to make decisions, but they do respond well to new or uncertain  situations. They also tend to have an autocratic leadership style. 3 Conceptual Style : Decision makers with a conceptual style have a high tolerance for ambiguity  and strong people and social concerns. They take a broad perspective in solving problems and like  to consider many options and future possibilities. These decision makers discuss things with as  many people as possible in order to gather a great deal of information and then rely on intuition in  making their decisions. Conceptual decision makers are also willing to take risks and tend to be  good at discovering creative solutions to problems. At the same time, however, they can foster an  idealistic and indecisive approach to decision making.
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