Taplin 2008 cited that it is the responsibility of schools to impart values

Taplin 2008 cited that it is the responsibility of

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Taplin (2008) cited that it is the responsibility of schools to impart values education in teaching. There is growing pressure for all teachers to become teachers of values, through modeling, discussing and critiquing values-related issues. Increasing numbers of individuals need to be able to think for themselves in a constantly changing environment, particularly as technology is making larger quantities of information easier to access and to manipulate. They also need to be able to adapt to unfamiliar or unpredictable situations more easily than people needed to in the past. Teaching encompasses skills and functions which are a part of everyday life. Zevenbergen and Zevenbergen (2009) were critical of emphases in curricular content that is irrelevant in workplaces; they also argued that such consideration of work demands has implications
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for the ways that lesson content is taught. They proposed that a greater emphasis on estimation, problem solving and reasoning, and a lesser emphasis on the development of procedural skills would assist in an increase in the relevance of learning to the workplace. Fink (2010) added the issue of career stage progression implicit in statements of professional teaching standards. Teachers do have different needs at different stages of their careers. The needs of new teachers are substantively different from those of mid-career teachers and from those in leadership roles. All contend nonetheless with cycles of aspiration, preparation, induction, development, stagnation and renewal. Some would also add that there are generational issues with which to attend in the preferred learning styles and career aspirations that separate the Baby Boomers from Generation X and Generation Y. The concept of school readiness, according to Rafoth, Buchenauer, Crissman and Halko (2012), typically refers to the child’s attainment of a certain set of emotional, behavioral, and cognitive skills needed to learn, work, and function successfully in school. Unfortunately, this common philosophy of “ready for school” places an undue burden on children by expecting them to meet the expectations of school. A more constructive way to
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consider school readiness is to remove the expectations from the child and place those expectations onto the schools and the families. Young children have wide ranging needs and require support in preparing them for the high standards of learning they will face in elementary school. High (2012) cited that school readiness includes the readiness of the individual child, the school’s readiness for children, and the ability of the family and community to support optimal early child development. It is the responsibility of schools to be ready for all children at all levels of readiness.
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