Answer you dont allow the vote if q s m s if you

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Answer You don’t allow the vote if | q - s | ≤ | m - s |. If you allow a vote here, you end up with m, and you don’t like it you allow the vote if | q - s |>| m s | If you allow a vote here, you end up with something better for you
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Slight Pause - Hastert Rule What is the Hastert rule? Why is it important?
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Answer Informal rule means legislation can only be brought up if preferred by a majority of the majority. Under the Hastert Rule, votes are rarely held in the House on an issue unless the Speaker prefers m to q . Is this good for democracy?
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The agenda-setter model: another wrinkle What if, for one reason or another, a vote has to be held? e.g.: budgets. annual federal budget must be voted upon in the House many school districts must hold annual referenda on public school budgets e.g.: popular outcry: “something must be done about X!” Recall that agenda setters can typically decide what a vote will be about . Thus even in these circumstances, an agenda setter can have tremendous power by determining the proposal to be voted on.
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The agenda-setter model: another wrinkle Call this proposal to be voted on p . The electorate will vote on whether to approve p . But what it’s really doing is deciding between p and q in a pair-wise vote. If p doesn’t pass, q remains the policy. And of course what this really means is if M prefers p to q , it will pass. If not, it won’t.
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Which p ’s are preferred by M to q ? Federal $ spent on national defense m q p4 p5 p3 p1 p2
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Which p ’s are preferred by M to q ? Federal $ spent on national defense m q p4 p5 p3 p1 p2 | p m | < | q m | | p m | ≥ | q m | | p m | ≥ | q m |
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Which p ’s are preferred by M to q ? Mathematically, we can say p will win the vote only if M prefers it to the status quo, that is: p wins only if | p m | < | q m | This means p wins if it is closer to m than to q
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p’s offered in these ranges will lose : q remains the policy Which p ’s are preferred by M to q ? Policy totally not ripped from Prof. Egan’s slides m q p’s for which M prefers q to p p’s for which M prefers q to p p ’s offered in this range will win : p will become the policy p’s for which M prefers p to q | p m | < | q m |
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Question What happens as m becomes farther from q?
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When m is far from q, more p ’s can win Federal $ spent on national defense m q p’s for which M prefers q to p p’s for which M prefers p to q p’s for which M prefers q to p | p m | < | q m |
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The agenda-setter model: another wrinkle All of this means that S can set p to manipulate the outcome to her advantage.
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What the vote will be about So what is S ’s optimal strategy? Well, there are three possible scenarios, or “cases.” I. s < q < m II. q < s < m III. q < m < s S has a different optimal strategy in each case. Let’s go through all 3 of them.
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