No port will allow them to dock because of the supposed cholera outbreak aboard

No port will allow them to dock because of the

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No port will allow them to dock because of the supposed cholera outbreak aboard, and they are forever exiled to cruise the river. Magical Realism and the Colombian History: ‘Magic realism’ is chiefly a Latin-American narrative style. It is characterized by the matter-of- fact inclusions of fantastic or mythical elements into apparently realistic fiction. Although this style is known in the literature of many cultures for many ages, the term ‘magic realism’ is a relatively recent one, first applied in the 1940s by Cuban novelist Alejo Carpentier. Many scholars argue that magic realism is a natural outcome of postcolonial writing, which must make sense of at least two separate realities—the reality of the conquerors as well as that of the
conquered. So, features of postcolonial socio-economic set up are quite common to find out in magic realism. Prominent among the Latin-American magic realists are the Colombian Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Marquez’s childhood contributed profusely in the use of magic realism in his novels, especially, in One Hundred Years of Solitude. Gabriel Garcia Marquez asserts that there’s not a single line in his novels which is not based on reality. He says in a conversation with his friend Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza (an interview, later published as The Fragrance of Guava): I was brought up by a grandmother and numerous aunts who all showered me with attention, and by maids who gave me many very happy childhood moments because their prejudices, while not fewer than those of the women in the family, were at least different. The woman who taught me to read was very beautiful and graceful and I used to like going to school just so I could see her. [Women] find their way more easily, with fewer navigational aids. . . . They make me feel secure. Apart from his colorful childhood memories, Marquez is hugely indebted to the socio-political history of Colombia for his magnificent samples of magic realism in One Hundred Years of Solitude. For example, the civil war between the Liberals and the Conservatives in the story directly echoes events similar to the historical events of Colombia. Michael Wood, in his book Gabriel Garcia Marquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude, says, “Colombia has a long radition of democracy. The Liberals and the Conservatives, who dominated nineteenth and most of twentieth century politics, stood for quite different things – reform or reaction, free trade or protection, separation or conjunction of church and state; and slowly turned into a rather narrow band of class interests”. We can say a huge extent of Colombian history gets into One Hundred Years of Solitude: the arguments over reform in the 19th century, the arrival of the railway, the War of the Thousand Days, the American fruit company, the cinema, the automobile, and the massacre of striking plantation workers in 1928. The most striking fact of modern Colombian history, known simply as the Violence, gets indirect expression in One Hundred Years of Solitude through guerillas, gangsters, self-defence groups, the police, the army, and the death of some 200,000 people. Even

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