Wiltshire roundway down 16 su 006647 1 identification

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Wiltshire Roundway Down 16 SU 006647 1 Identification of bed-burial as a distinctive Anglo-Saxon funerary rite can be attributed to Speake, Bed Burial on Swallowcilffe Down , pp. 98-115. Further, the discussions in Sherlock, Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Street House , pp. 109-113; Penn, Cemetery at Shrubland Hall Quarry , pp. 57-58. 2 In addition, Bateman discovered a bed burial on Lapwing Hill, Derbyshire (SK 166717): Bateman, Ten Years' Diggings , pp. 68-70. However, the presence of a sword in a leather sheath in the burial would suggest that its occupant was male. 3 Meaney, Gazetteer , p. 63. 4 Malim, Hines, and Duhig, Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Edix Hill , pp. 52-53, 67-68. 5 Lethbridge, Cemetery at Shudy Camps , pp. 10-12. 6 Dickens and Lucy, Anglo-Saxon Teen Buried in Bed . 7 Sherlock, Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Street House , pp. 31-33, 89-100, 109-113 8 Penn, Cemetery at Shrubland Hall Quarry , pp. 24-31, 41-56. 9 Smith, Collectanea Antiqua: Volume IV , pp. 162-64. 10 Stoodley and Schuster, Collingbourne Ducis, Wiltshire . 11 Speake, Bed Burial on Swallowcilffe Down . 12 Lethbridge, Cemetery at Shudy Camps , p. 8. 13 Bateman, Vestiges of the Antiquities of Derbyshire , pp. 37-39. 14 Hoare, Ancient History of South Wiltshire , p. 235. 15 Carver, Sutton Hoo , pp. 107-114, 143-44. 16 Semple and Williams, 'Excavation on Roundway Down' , with references therein.
The Origins of Anglo-Saxon Kingship 229 County Burial Grid Reference Winklebury Hill (Grave 9) 17 ST 950212 17 Pitt-Rivers, Excavations in Cranborne Chase: Volume II , pp. 257-58, 264-7, 281, 286.
Peter J W Burch 230 III: Calculation for Estimating the Volume of a Burial Mound In general, a burial mound may be considered to be the following shape in radial section (Fig.32). 1 This can be thought of as a segment of a circle, i.e. the portion of a circle cut off by a cord, in this case the base of the burial mound. In three dimensions, this is the portion of a sphere cut off by a chordic plane, known as a spherical cap (Fig.33). 1 This does not account for flat topped mounds. Any estimate gained will, therefore, provide a slight overestimate, although as any mound will have inevitably eroded considerable over time this is not deemed to matter. Fig.32, Burial Mound in Radial Section Fig.33, Burial Mound Modelled as a Spherical Cap
The Origins of Anglo-Saxon Kingship 231 The size of the sphere and the position of the chordic plane can be varied to accommodate the basal diameter and height of any given burial. 2 Thus all shapes and sizes of burial mounds can be accommodated. The volume of a burial mound may, therefore, be estimated by calculating the volume of the spherical cap which it can be modelled as. The volume of a spherical cap is: 𝑉 = 𝜋ℎ 6 (3𝑎 2 + ℎ 2 ) This is derived by integrating 𝜋𝑥 2 between 𝑟 and 𝑟 − ℎ , where 𝑟 is the radius of the circle, is the height of the spherical cap or burial mound and 𝑎 is the radius of the base of the spherical cap or burial mound.

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