Dartmouth College v Woodward Dartmouth College v Woodward was a Marshall Court

Dartmouth college v woodward dartmouth college v

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Dartmouth College v. Woodward Dartmouth College v. Woodward was a Marshall Court decision. The case severely limited the power of state governments to control corporations, which were the emerging form of business.
The New Hampshire legislature tried to change Dartmouth from a private to a public institution by having its charter revoked. The Court ruled that the charter issued during colonial days still constituted a contract and could not be arbitrarily changed without the consent of both parties. The case reaffirmed the sanctity of contracts. Embargo Act The Embargo of 1807 was America’s declaration to keep its own ships from leaving port for any foreign destination. Jefferson hoped to avoid contact with vessels of either of the warring sides of the Napoleonic Wars. The result was economic depression in the United States, which angered the Federalists, who were well-represented in Northeast commerce and were hit hard by the financial downturn. Force Bill Authorized the president’s use of the army to compel states to comply with federal law. Indian Removal Act provided funds for uprooting the so-called Five Civilized Tribes—the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole—with a population of around 60,000 living in North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi. Louisiana Purchase The Louisiana Purchase was bought for $15 million from France, doubling the territory of the United States. Jefferson was concerned about the legality of purchasing land without having Constitutional authority, so he used the presidential power of treaty-making for the purchase.
The purchase helped remove France from the western borders of the United States. Farmers could more easily send their goods down the Mississippi River and through New Orleans, facilitating transportation to Europe. The expansion westward created more states with Jeffersonian Republican representation, and the Federalists became a marginalized party. It opened land to agrarian expansion, which was part of Jefferson’s social ideology. Marbury v. Madison William Marbury had been commissioned justice of the peace by President John Adams. His commission was part of Adams’s “midnight appointments” in his last days in office. Marbury’s commission was not delivered, so he sued President Jefferson’s Secretary of State, James Madison. Chief Justice John Marshall held that even though Marbury was entitled to the commission, the statute that allowed Marbury’s remedy was unconstitutional, as it granted the Supreme Court powers beyond what the Constitution permitted. This decision paved the way for judicial review, which gave courts the power to declare statutes unconstitutional. McCulloch v. Maryland McCulloch v. Maryland was a Marshall Court decision.

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