(17) Freedom's Boundaries..., 1890–1900(1).pptx

Immigration in the gilded age chinese exclusion act

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Immigration in the Gilded Age Chinese Exclusion Act (1882) Severely limited Chinese and other Asian immigration. Barriers to Chinese and Asian immigration remained until 1943 30% of all prospective immigrants at Angel Island were denied entry.
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Immigrant Enclaves Factors Contributing: Ethnic Neighborhoods Proximity to Family Cultural Considerations Examples: Little Italy” in New York “Chinatown” in San Francisco.
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age The economic advances of the Gilded Age masked several inequities. Generally, the rich got richer and the poor got poorer. Many in the Upper Classes searched for a rationale to justify their immense wealth.
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age “Social Darwinism” Term coined by British Sociologist Herbert Spencer . Applies Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution, specifically “ survival of the fittest ” to society as a whole. This idea argued that some members of society were simply better suited to adjust and thrive in an industrial society.
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age Wage inequities existed on many levels including by skill, region, race, and gender. Unskilled and semi-skilled labor barely made enough money to feed themselves let alone their families. Immigrants, living in tenements, usually required more than one wage earner. Between 1878 and 1893, real wages increased by just 20%
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age “Millionaires” This term first came into use during the Gilded Age. In 1860, only 300 Americans had personal wealth in excess on $1 million. In 1893, 4,000 did. “Robber Barons” A nickname given more unscrupulous businessmen who made vast fortunes on the backs on their employees and customers.
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age “Trust” A business arrangement in which ownership of companies is unclear and… Several companies within an industry may be owned by the same people as well. “Monopoly” When a company has total control of its market.
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age “John D. Rockefeller” and “Standard Oil” Started in the refining business in Cleveland, Ohio in 1862. In 1870, he incorporated Standard Oil Company of Ohio capitalized at $1 million. Rockefeller soon resolved to decrease his competition in all aspects of the business. Rockefeller’s goal was to “ pay no one a profit .”
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age “Andrew Carnegie” and “Carnegie Steel” Born in Scotland Immigrated to the U.S. in 1848 at the age of 13. Started working immediately as a in a textile mill in Allegheny, PA. He was paid $1.20 a week. Five years later, Carnegie was the personal secretary and telegrapher for the Superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad.
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Wealth and Inequity in the Gilded Age In 1873, Carnegie sold-off his iron mills and concentrated on the steel business.
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