now from a high a decade ago of close to 70 and the employers who do provide

Now from a high a decade ago of close to 70 and the

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now (from a high a decade ago of close to 70%); and the employers who do provide benefits are cutting them and forcing employees to pay more themselves in the form of copayments and deductibles. The 15% who are uninsured are surely faced with both health and financial threats. But the cost problem now threatens everyone else as well, including those using the Medicare and Medicaid programs”.The Present Health Care IndustryOver the past 10 years a continuously prediction on health care has been made. In the wake of HIPPA, more patients, more technology, more information, a different delivery model, innovation driven, “HIPAA began to embed in the everyday practices of providers and healthcarestaff. HIM professionals found a new career avenue as healthcare facilities developed new roles like privacy and security officers, who were hired to ensure HIPAA compliance. But just as the industry got used to the regulations, HIPAA enforcement and compliance changed in a dramatic way after 2009. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), Congress passed in 2009 the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH). The HITECH Act greatly strengthened HIPAA by dramatically increasing the penalties for HIPAA violations—up to $1.5 million for a violation in certain circumstances. The HITECH Act included the first federal data security breach notification requirement, and also required HHS to conduct HIPAA privacy and security audits. The act also authorized HIPAA enforcement by states’ attorneys general” (“HIPAA Turns 10: Analyzing the Past, Present and Future Impact,” 2013, para.)..
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HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY PAPER4“With newfound leverage, OCR began to ratchet up HIPAA enforcement in dramatic fashion. For example, in 2009 OCR settled with CVS Caremark for $2.25 million for failure to properly dispose of PHI. In 2011, OCR fined Cignet Health Center $4.35 million for a HIPAA violation and its corresponding failure to cooperate with OCR’s investigation. In 2012, HHS settled with the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, which agreed to pay a $1.7 million fine for an incident involving the theft of a USB drive” (“HIPAA Turns 10: Analyzing thePast, Present and Future Impact,” 2013, para.).Current Trends of Health Care“The U.S. healthcare system continues to evolve in response to these challenges and the additional pressures of increasing costs and the increasing numbers of uninsured. Ten trends for the next decade are evident: 1) more patients, 2) more technology, 3) more information, 4) the
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