Mac address secure mac address maximum max secure

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mac-address Secure mac address maximum Max secure addresses violation Security violation mode <cr> Switch1(config-if)#sw port-security mac-address sticky
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Cisco CCENT Cram Guide v3.0 © Paul Browning 2017 The port must be statically set to either trunk or access, you can’t apply switch security to a dynamic port. If you add the sticky command to the configuration the switch will store the learned mac addresses in the running configuration. Violation Action is the action the switch will take should a violation take place. By default, it’s set to shutdown. Mode Port Action Traffic Syslog Violation Counter Protect Protected Unknown MACs discarded No No Shutdown Errdisabled Disabled Yes and SNMP trap Incremented Restrict Open # of excess MAC traffic denied Yes and SNMP trap Incremented A series of events can cause Cisco switches to put their ports into a special disabled mode called err- disabled. This basically means that a particular port has been disabled (shut down) due to an error. Fix by bouncing the interface ( shutdown and then no shutdown ). VTP Password: Restrict VLANS Passing on Ports: Hex Numbering You know that decimal numbers consist of 10 digits ranging from 0 to 9. Binary consists of two digits ranging from 0 to 1. Hex numbering ranges from 0 to F and has 16 digits. These addresses are also referred to as base 10, base 2, and base 16, respectively. You can see that each numbering system starts with a zero, so: Decimal 0123456789 Binary 01 Hex 0123456789ABCDEF 27 Switch1(config-if)#switchport trunk allowed vlan 7-12 Switch1(config)#vtp password cisco Switch1(config-if)#switchport port-security violation ? protect Security violation protect mode restrict Security violation restrict mode (sends SNMP trap) shutdown Security violation shutdown mode (sends SNMP trap)
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Cisco CCENT Cram Guide v3.0 © Paul Browning 2017 When you write these addresses, you may not realize it but you are using columns from right to left; the rightmost is the one column and the next column is the base number times the preceding column, so: Numbering Base N to 3 rd power N to 2 nd power N to 1 st power N 10 Decimal 1000 100 10 1 2 Binary 8 4 2 1 16 Hex 4096 256 16 1 You can see that each successive column from the right increases in value. For decimal numbering, it is 10 multiplied by 1. For binary, it is 1 and then 1 multiplied by the numbering system of 2. If you compare the three numbering systems up to the last hex digit, you can begin to see why hex is the preferred format for IPv6 addressing. Decimal Binary Hex 0 0000 0 1 0001 1 2 0010 2 3 0011 3 4 0100 4 5 0101 5 6 0110 6 7 0111 7 8 1000 8 9 1001 9 10 1010 A 11 1011 B 12 1100 C 13 1101 D 14 1110 E 15 1111 F IPv6 In order to provide enough addresses for our needs many years into the future, IPv6 has been designed to provide many trillions of available addresses. In order to do this, the numbering range has been expanded from 32 binary bits to 128 bits. Every 4 bits can be represented as one hex digit (as can be seen from the chart above). Logic then dictates that two hex digits will give us 8 bits, which is a single byte, or octet.
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