By using Indigenous people to oversee and to provide at the local level

By using indigenous people to oversee and to provide

This preview shows page 26 - 28 out of 38 pages.

By using Indigenous people to oversee, and to provide at the local level, services, it should be possible to break down many barriers and encourage Indigenous people to access the service. Engage the services of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander interpreters, health workers and colleagues as cultural brokers as required to meet duty of care According to Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2011 data, 16.6% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island language speakers report that they do not speak English well or at all. To communicate effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people in many parts of Australia you need an interpreter. Employing an interpreter leaves no room for misunderstanding because of a language barrier. Interpreters must be: Resources to support visual and iconic strategies Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health workers, liaison officers and other colleagues Using professional interpreters means you can be sure of the level of skill and quality of the interpreting. Professional interpreters are also trained to maintain confidentiality, impartiality and accuracy as part of their code of ethics. Professional interpreters are impartial providing agencies with a level of certainty about the information being provided. Friends and family members should not be used as interpreters. Children and young relatives are not appropriate interpreters in any context. Both clients and family members may be embarrassed when family members act as interpreters. Communication may be distorted or changed because of a lack of competence in English or the other language or bias on the part of the family member or advocate. However, the client may feel more comfortable with a family member, bilingual associate or worker present for support, along with the professional interpreter. The Australian Government is committed to providing an affordable, accessible and high-quality, early learning and child care system to all Australian children. Many studies show that high-quality education and care can stimulate a child's development and help overcome disadvantage. Children from Indigenous families are encouraged to be part of the early childhood learning and care experience in Australia. Support is available to child care services to ensure they provide an inclusive environment for children from Indigenous families. Programmes, like the Inclusion and Professional Support Programme ”, offer specialist support to help child care services to include an Indigenous child (or indeed a child from any culturally and linguistically diverse background) into care.
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Page 27 of 38 Created March 2014 Professional Support Coordinators, Indigenous Professional Support Units and Inclusion Support Agencies throughout Australia work with child care services to ensure they provide quality child care that is safe, culturally appropriate and meets the needs of Indigenous children. These organisations provide resources, training, support and advice to child care professionals about all aspects of service provision, including children's development, programming and financial management.
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  • Indigenous Australians, torres strait islander, Torres Strait

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