Intro to Moral and Political Philosophy Day 1

Religious practice base our conclusions on religious

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Religious practice (Base our conclusions on religious principals  that we have been taught) Threats of Deflation (We don’t need these sort of arguments) o Aim to show that ethical though isn’t as needed as we think o Radical forms of particularism (“Is it right to lie?” “Well, who knows?  You can’t say anything about it. Each situation is unique?”) o Fatalism (Because determinism is true, it doesn’t matter what we do or  think; everything you do is completely determined by past events and  the laws of nature. You have no free will, so it doesn’t really matter  what you do. We are going to do what our genes determined us to do  so there’s no point in discussing it) – You can’t help but see yourself  make a choice. Even if things are predetermined, you still have to act Relativism: An Argument for Relativism
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The “cultural differences” argument (What’s good for one society may not be  right or morally acceptable for another) Different cultures have different moral codes  Appeal to famous examples: polygamy Therefore, there are no objective, universal, culturally independent facts or  considerations which determine the truth or falsehood of different moral  claims. You can be culturally sensitive without being extremely rigid A true example of relativism: Gender norms in varying cultures, i.e. the  illegality of a women wearing a full vail because theyre not second class  citizens vs. the required use of a full vail by women in the Taliban community  because they are believed to be second class citizens
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