Because the industry knew about this situation

Info icon This preview shows pages 36–38. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Because the industry knew about this situation, another version of IP addressing called IP, version 6,or IPv6, was created. IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses, instead of the smaller, 32-bit IPv4 addresses. Even though IPv6 addresses are only 96-bits longer, the increase in possible addresses is exponential. In fact, the amount of possible IPv6 addresses is 3.4 times 10 to the 38th power. To put that number in perspective, let's say you had one dollar for each unique IPv6 address. Even if you're going to spend one billion dollars every second since the universe began, you would have only spent one percent of your money. As you can see, we're probably not going to run out of IPv6 addresses anytime soon. Address Format 1:40-2:56 Here's an example IPv6 address. Notice how it's much longer and looks nothing like an IPv4 address.IPv6 addresses have eight divisions, which are separated by colons. Each division is called a quartet,and consists of four hexadecimal numbers. Each hexadecimal number has 16 possible values, zero through nine and A to F. IPv6 addresses are pretty long. Luckily there are several ways we can simplify IPv6 addresses to make them easier to remember and use. One way is by omitting any leading zeros within a quartet. For example, this quartet could be written as 8CA, and this one would be AB. Know that we can't omit trailing zeros, only leading ones. Another way to simplify the address is to replace any quartet block that contains only zeros with a double colon, like this. This simplified address is much smaller, and much easier to work with. There's one rule about omitting zeros that you need to be aware of, you can only omit one block of zeros in an IPv6 address. This means, we can either omit this block here, which has three quartets of zeros, or this block here, which is one quartet of zeros. Either way works, but we can't omit both. Address Segments 2:57-3:20
Image of page 36

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Just like with IPv4 addresses, IPv6 addresses have two parts, a network address and a host address.However, with IPv6, they are called the prefix and the interface ID. Unlike IPv4, the division between the two is always in the same place, right down the middle. The first 64 bits are the prefix, and the last 64 bits are the interface ID. Prefix 3:21-4:06 Within the prefix portion, the address is further divided into segments. The first three digits are used to define regional Internet registries. Different parts of the world are assigned different numbers to use for Internet assignment. Because these are the first 12 bits of the address, often times a /12 is used to denote which part of the address we're referring to. The next segment of the prefix ends after 32 bits, and is used to identify individual ISPs. It's designated using /32. The rest of the prefix is used by the ISP to assign to specific businesses or entities, who would use the last quartet to define various subnets within the organization.
Image of page 37
Image of page 38
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern