They are better than others but they quickly become worse when they fester

They are better than others but they quickly become

This preview shows page 8 - 10 out of 16 pages.

They are better than others, but they quickly become worse when they festerShakespeare goes from describing people to describing a flower, the couplet at the end ties the two parts together by saying “Sweet things turns sour by deeds, and Lilies that fester (sour deed) smell far worse than weeds.21. #116 (“Let me not to the marriage of true minds”) 549This sonnet attempts to define love, by telling both what it is and is not. In the first quatrain, the speaker says that love—”the marriage of true minds”—is perfect and unchanging; it does not “admit impediments,” and it does not change when it find changes in the loved one. In the second quatrain, the speaker tells what love is through a metaphor: a guiding star to lost ships (“wand’ring barks”) that is not susceptible to storms(it “looks on tempests and is never shaken”). In the third quatrain, the speaker again describes what love is not: it is not susceptible to time. Though beauty fades in time as rosy lips and cheeks come within “his bending sickle’s compass,” love does not change with hours and weeks: instead, it “bears it out ev’n to the edge of doom.” In the couplet, the speaker attests to his certainty that love is as he says: if his statements can be proved to be error, he declares, he must never have written a word, and no man can ever have [truly] been in love.22. #129 (“The’ expense of spirit”) 549The sonnet starts with a negative definition of lust, “The expense of spirit in a waste of shame is lust in action.” He then lists all of the destructive qualities of lust. “Lust is perjur’d, murderous, bloody, full of blame, savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust, enjoy’d no sooner but despised straight.” Decrying bad old lust, the man is on a full-scaleguilt trip. Up until this point lust is portrayed as purely evil. In the next lines, his attitude toward lust is tempered somewhat because of its conclusion. Lust drives the taker mad,
past reason, in pursuit and possession of its quarry, but can lust be evil when it leads to bliss? The poem has an upbeat and somewhat humorous and ironic ending concluding with the following two-lines.“All this the world well knows, yet none knows wellTo shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.”The world well knows that all the above regarding lust is true, yet no one gives up the chase to reach ‘heaven’. William Shakespeare’s candor in exposing his guilt and shame about lust in this short poem impresses in his honesty and his willingness to face his ownWebsite: -129-the-expense-of-spirit-in-a-waste-of-shame23. #130 (“My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”) 550 Anti Petrarchan, puts blazon on it’s head. 2Sonnet 130 is like a love poem turned on its head. Usually, if you were talking about your beloved, you would go out of your way to praise her, to point all the ways that she isthe best. In this case, though, Shakespearespends this poem comparing his mistress's

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture