Employee training development feedback Employee rewards and compensation

Employee training development feedback employee

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Employee training, development, feedback - Employee rewards and compensation  - Compliance with the law (make sure employees give adequate assistance to  everyone) - Research (as a criterion in validation) Examples of dimensions - Reliability - Credibility - Responsiveness - Competence - Understanding the customer - Access - Communication - Courtesy Active solicitation methods - Motivated by direct contact with customers - Representative sample - High response rates
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- High cost Passive feedback solicitation methods: - Customer-initiated response - Customers choose to participate - Low response rates - Low cost Mystery shopping:  “shopper” observes and participates in a service experience, then  rates the employee Issues - Selecting and training customers can be difficult - Reliability of ratings - Employees’ acceptance of deception - Cost Comment cards Issues - Response rates - Types of customers who respond - Anonymity - Incentives and appeals - Cost Advantages of customer assessments - Customers are the ones who need to be satisfied - Good source of information - Provide an additional perspective - Direct contact with the employee Disadvantages - Motivation - Different questionnaires may be needed - Criterion contamination - Lack of focus on the individual employee Advantages of using multiple raters - Ability to observe various job facets - Reliability - Fairness - Ratee acceptance - Improved defensibility Varying levels of agreement between raters
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360-degree feedback or multisource feedback:  a procedure that uses information  obtained from supervisors, peers, subordinates, self-ratings and clients or customers to  provide the employee with feedback for development and training purposes - Intent is to provide employees with feedback about their performance from  numerous independent sources - Complete picture - More likely to occur in larger organizations - Largely limited to managerial-level employees - Majority use it solely for the purposes of employee development - Information from different sources is likely to disagree to some extent - Relatively high correlation between peer and supervisor ratings - Only modest correlations between self-peer and self-supervisor ratings - Over time, some ratings may converge Two key assumptions 1. Awareness of discrepancies enhance self-awareness 2. Enhanced self-awareness is key to maximum performance Increase in use because - Flatter organizations - Continuous learning - Complex jobs - Less confidence in traditional appraisals Feedback of appraisal information Two objectives 1. Review job responsibilities and discuss how well the employee has met them 2. Identify future goals Effective appraisal interviews Before - Communicate often about performance - Receive training in performance appraisal - Judge your own performance - Encourage subordinate preparation - Retrieve information from memory During - Encourage employee participation - Judge performance - Be specific - Actively listen - Avoid destructive criticism
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- Set goals for future improvement After - Communicate about performance - Assess progress towards goals - Make rewards contingent on performances
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  • Fall '14
  • SarahJaneRoss
  • Psychology, supervisor, Introduction 2003

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