Fahrenheit 451 is written in 3rd person limited just to Montag We are brought

Fahrenheit 451 is written in 3rd person limited just

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so he never gets any time to relax or get comfortable. Fahrenheit 451 is written in 3rd person limited just to Montag. We are brought with Montag throughout his journey during a couple of weeks. We only see Montag's actions directly, with all of the other characters, we see what they do when Montag figures it out. For example, in the beginning of the book we figure out that Mildred “took all the pills in [her] bottle last night” (Bradbury 17) but we do not see her do it, we don't know what she was thinking when she took all of the pills, and we do not know why she took all of the pills. We learn about what she did when Montag does. Bradbury did this so we see things only in the way that Montag interprets them and so we learn things as he does. He also did this so there is a lot of suspense. No answers are told to us straight forward, like how Clarisse died, or if she even did die. We are told by Mildred that she got “run over by a car. Four days ago” (Bradbury 44), but we can not be sure if she is right or telling the truth because we didn’t see it directly. Ray Bradbury has a very unique writing style that he shows in Fahrenheit 451. Probably the easiest way to know that Bradbury wrote it is to look if the author uses figurative language. Bradbury uses a lot of figurative language, like metaphors, similes, and a lot symbolism, to get
6 his ideas and visions across to the reader in a unique and interesting way. To the firemen, a python symbolizes the hose that sprays kerosene, as Bradbury puts it, “this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world” (Bradbury 1). Also “the Salamander [slamming] around corners … boomed to a halt” (Bradbury 106) symbolises the firetruck. When writing, Bradbury is not afraid to use short sentences or to have one sentence paragraphs, in fact, he does it a lot. When he does these one sentence paragraphs, it is usually for something important and it draws you attention to it. He is very effective at doing this, for example, when he says “and the war began and ended in that instant” (Bradbury 151) it draws your attention to it and tells you that the drop of one bomb can cause that much destruction. One theme in Fahrenheit 451 is the idea that too much censorship in things because they make “our minorities upset and stirred” (Bradbury 56) can lead to insane things like making books illegal. The reason why reading books is “against the law” (Bradbury 5) in Fahrenheit 451 is because all people “want to be happy” (Bradbury 56) but they can’t be happy if some books are offensive to them, so the government made those books illegal. But since almost all books are offensive to at least one person, all books are going to be gone. This theme is very true about our world today. You always have to watch what you say because it will probably offend someone. For example, even team names like the Washington Redskins are offensive to Native Americans even though they were named that to make people remember the Native Americans not offend them. If these things keep on going the same way that they are, books could become illegal in our society or something else that is equally as terrifying.

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