Open source business model 554 746 now given the free

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Open Source Business Model 5:54-7:46 Now, given the free nature of open-source software, you may be wondering why organizations and developers put their time, effort, and money into developing these applications if they're just going to give them away for free, because everybody likes to get a paycheck, right? Well, organizations that release open-source products typically use a variety of alternative options for generating revenue, so they can keep on developing new products. There are many different options available. For example, they may rely on contributions. Some open-source projects will simply ask you to contribute financially so they can keep on working. Other open-source projects may release a base version of their software that they give away for free,but then charge you a fee for adding highly- desirable add-ons that really ratchet up what the application is capable of doing. In other words, they hook you with the free version and then charge you for the really good stuff. Other open-source projects may provide support contracts. They may release their software for free,but then charge a fee for providing technical support. And this is actually a really useful option for a large organization that wants to implement open-source software enterprise-wide because it ensures that any problems that come along with that software will be fixed quickly when they do, instead of waiting for a system administrator to research the problem on the web for six or seven days, trying to figure out a solution to the problem. Other open-source projects may provide training contracts. Basically, they will give you the software for free and then provide you training on how to use it for a fee. Some open-source projects will partner with a commercial organization. In this situation, two versions of the application will probably be created; one that is proprietary and one that's open-source. The proprietary version is typically then used to finance the development of the free version. And sometimes an open-source project will just simply sell subscriptions. They may sell subscriptions for things like an online account or maybe cloud server access. Summary 7:47-7:54 That's it for this lesson. In this lesson, we discussed software licensing. We first reviewed the proprietary software licensing model, and then we discussed the open-source software alternative. Digital Rights Management (DRM) 0:00-0:55 In this lesson, we're going to discuss digital rights management or DRM. Now DRM is an umbrella term that encompasses many different technologies that are designed to restrict the use of copyrighted digital data. Now this topic is very important for you to understand as a system administrator because you may be tempted from time to time in your job role to try to circumvent DRM technologies. For example, let's suppose your organization requires a particular application be installed on 10 users' workstations, but your organization only owns three licenses. In this situation you may be tempted to go out on the web and search for codes that
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