Remember the RPE rating of perceived exer tion discussed in chapter 3 RPE is a

Remember the rpe rating of perceived exer tion

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Remember the RPE (rating of perceived exer- tion) discussed in chapter 3? RPE is a subjective
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Setting Goals, Assessing Fitness, and Training Safely 41 way to gauge your intensity. You want to be able to recover between sets, and RPE is a conven- ient and effective way to monitor your workout intensity and recovery periods and to focus on quality repetitions. Listen to your body and pay attention to the signs and internal dialogue your body has with you. Do not ignore yourself! Some days are better than others. You should challenge yourself but not overdo it. Again, use RPE as a way to monitor your intensity and push your- self, but do not push too hard, too soon. Don’t be afraid to take an occasional day off if your body is telling you that you need the extra rest. Also, get plenty of sleep between your kettle- bell workouts so you can fully recover from one workout and be ready to go after it again the next time. Don’t Skip the Warm-Up and Cool-Down Take the time to prepare with a thorough warm-up before vigorous exercise. A good warm-up takes 5 to 10 minutes. Also take time to stretch and cool down following vigorous exercise. Allow 5 to 10 minutes after your kettle- bell training to decompress, stretch out, and reduce the excitation of your nervous system. The cool-down is every bit as important to your long-term progress as the workout itself. The warm-up and cool-down will be explained thoroughly in the next chapter. Take Your Time When working out with kettlebells, progress conservatively and do not rush! Refrain from moving too fast and doing too much volume or progressing too quickly in load. Developing skill and fitness with kettlebells takes time and prac- tice. But there is no hurry; it is worth doing well and staying injury free. You can always do more next time, but if you do too much, too soon, you will most likely pay a big price and may not bounce back so quickly. If you’re unsure, be conservative. The main cause of injuries is selecting a kettlebell that is too heavy or doing too much volume of training with poor form (emphasizing quantity over quality). Be careful not to strain. As you become more experienced, you will be able to push your body further in your training, but you have to be patient. Stop short of straining. Go a bit further each time, but it is not worth it to push too soon. Leave a little something in the tank, so to speak. Also, think long term. Your progress should continue over time, so do not try to accomplish all of your fitness goals in a day or a week or a month. Remember that Rome was not built in a day, and be willing to invest in your long- term progress by being consistent with gradual improvements from week to week and month to month. Before you know it, you will look back and see all your progress.
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  • Spring '16
  • oidfk
  • strength training, Physical exercise, kettlebells

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