D there must be no smoking open flames exposed flame

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(d) There must be no smoking, open flames, exposed flame heaters, flare pots or open flame lights within 50 feet of the fueling area or fueling equipment. The fueling area must be posted with “NO SMOKING” signs. EXCEPTION: Aircraft pre-heaters are exempt. However, do not fuel while the heaters are in operation. (e) Before refueling, ground the fueling equipment and the helicopter and electrically bond the fueling nozzle to the helicopter. Using conductive hose does not accomplish this bonding. All grounding and bonding connections must be electrically and mechanically firm to clean unpainted metal parts. (f) Pump fuel only by hand or power, do not pour or use gravity flow. Nozzles must be self-closing or have deadman controls and must not be blocked open. Do not drag nozzles on the ground. (g) In case of a spill, immediately stop fueling until the person in charge determines that it is safe to resume the operation. Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) and 656.726(4). Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 through 654.295. Hist: OR-OSHA Admin. Order 4-1998, f/8/28/98, ef. 10/1/98. 437-004-1805 Rope, Chain, Rigging, and Hoists. (1) Scope. These are standards for the safe use of hoists, rope, chain, and fittings. (2) Definitions. Mousing – Using small cordage or wire to prevent unintended separation of rigging components. Rope – Wire rope unless otherwise specified. 437-004-1750(24)(a) N-14 437-004-1805(2)
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Oregon Administrative Rules Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division ROPE, CHAIN, RIGGING, & HOISTS / TACKLE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT N (3) Loading and capacity. Do not load any rigging equipment or hoisting device more than its rated safe working load or capacity. (4) Inspection. Inspect rigging and hoisting devices before use and as necessary during use to ensure safety. Immediately remove from service defective rigging or hoisting devices. (5) Operators – handling loads. (a) Workers must not ride hooks, slings, rigging, or loads. Suspend or elevate a person only when using a safe personnel lift. (b) Personnel lift must meet these requirements: (A) The structure must be rigid and strong enough to support loads with a safety factor of four times the intended load. (B) The personnel lift must be big enough to accommodate all persons without crowding, and to provide sufficient work space so workers will not hinder or obstruct each other. (C) There must be standard guardrails on all sides of the personnel lift. (See 4/D, OAR 437-004-0320(6) for guardrail design specifications.) (D) The personnel lift must have supports on all four corners that provide full stability against tipping while occupied. (E) Secure the load lifting attachment for the personnel lift to the crane or derrick hook in a way that will prevent accidental release. (c) Only one person will give operating signals during hoisting operations. EXCEPTION: In an emergency, anyone may give a “stop” signal; such signal must be obeyed.
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  • Spring '13
  • L
  • Occupational safety and health, Health Division, Oregon Occupational Safety

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