Postmodernism in film claiming that each mode exists

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postmodernism in film, claiming that “each mode exists in a different set of institutions that provide for the production and display of films and…a distinct context for the development of postmodernism” (Peterson 142). This opens up the concept of postmodernism in film to include a variety of techniques, from angling and lighting to sound and space. Though Van Sant’s Psycho replicates Hitchcock’s original in visual composure, the spare shots that do differentiate bear an underlying shift in focus. The end of any film is usually a quintessential mode of conclusion, an attempt to render a final image in the viewer’s mind as to where the characters are heading at the end of the picture. The end of Hitchcock’s Psycho is a
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final dissolve into the swamp where Marion’s car is being extracted by chain, with her body and the money being resurrected from the murky grave. While Van Sant includes this scene in his version, the final shot is not the car but rather the morning sky over the mountains surrounding the Bates Motel. Where the original denotes violence and literal decay, the remake intends our final focus to be on the aesthetic beauty of the surrounding countryside, the vibrant life of nature itself. This stark difference, life and death, leave a lasting impression of difference on a remake intended solely to capture the original "shot for shot”. The general ambience of Van Sant’s remake is darker, as the murders of Marion and Detective Arbogast are more grisly, heightened by the intensified sounds of knife stabbings and more visual bloodshed. Whether intended or not, Van Sant’s Psycho loses a great deal of underlying dark humor from the original, seeming to focus more on the suspense and terror of the subject matter. This could be a marketing ploy to reach a younger demographic that seeks horror rather than comedy, but humor was lost in transition between the two films. The slight differences in concluding shot and mood of the film affirm some influence of postmodernism in the film, as if Van Sant is attempting to break his own formulated mold of cinematic replication.
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