2 Protection from waves during extreme storm events nurseries set up during the

2 protection from waves during extreme storm events

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2) Protection from waves during extreme storm events – nurseries set up during the non-typhoon season may be destroyed when storms come. 3) Relatively flat, with firm substrate and well-drained (not waterlogged). 4) Under the shade of mangrove/other trees – but should avoid insects (e.g., larvae from talisay leaves falling on mangrove seedlings). 5) Proximity to the planting site (for backyard nurseries, to reduce transport costs). 6) Preferably close to a freshwater supply. 7) Preferably close to seed/propagule sources. FIG. 6. Small-scale CMRP nurseries (shaded by mature trees) are readily accessible because of their backyard location, as in Ajuy, Iloilo
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15 B. Preparation for Field Collection Prior to the fieldwork 1) Consult commercial calendars (with tide levels coded in red or blue color) or a tidal calendar (Fig. 7) to select a suitable date and time. FIG. 7. A tidal calendar that shows the time and height of tides for Iloilo station in January 2011. Nursery 2) Collectors (volunteers/PO members) should prepare the following: appropriate clothes (longsleeved shirts, hats), rubber shoes/booties (Fig. 8).
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16 Community-based Mangrove Rehabilitation Training Manual 3) Prepare logistics and materials transportation, snacks, certificates for volunteers seedling polybags ⦿ 8 x 12” (20 x 30.5 cm) for wildings ⦿ 4 x 6” (10 x 15 cm) for seeds shovels or digging blades (tagad) On the day of field work: 4) Give a brief orientation to the volunteers about nurseries, e.g. their importance, site requirements, and divide them into groups of seed/wilding collectors, baggers and haulers. 5) For better supervision, a ratio of one supervisor or facilitator (ZSL/project staff): 15-20 participants is recommended (Fig. 9). More than this will mean some volunteers may be unsupervised and apply wrong practices, e.g., throwing – instead of carefully carrying – the bagged seedlings, thereby causing higher mortality. FIG. 8. Requirements for mangrove planting activity: cap, long- sleeved shirt, long pants and booties/thick socks for footwear, and digging blades.
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17 FIG. 9. Mangrove outplanting: a) briefing volunteers, b) marking rows of 1-1.5 m distance for staking and making holes, c-f) removing seedling from polybag, placing inside hole, levelling soil surface, and tying seedling to stake. C. Collection and Bagging of Wildings Wildings (also spelled wildlings) are often observed near mother trees, retained by mangrove roots (seedling bank), and dikes of abandoned ponds, or caught on the beach strand (Fig. 10). The latter are short- lived because of wave exposure, in contrast to those trapped by roots or along the dikes of ponds, which remain undisturbed and grow to one meter or more. 1) Collect wildings not more than 40 cm, preferably 10-30 cm tall (with at least 6 leaves ). 2) Use a shovel or digging blade (Fig. 8) to carefully remove the plant with soil still attached to the roots to ensure they are surrounded by a ball of earth (Fig. 11).
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