Second Research Article The aim of this study was to assess the effects of an

Second research article the aim of this study was to

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Second Research Article The aim of this study was to assess the effects of an informal HIV awareness event on college students. A questionnaire-based survey was used to sample 106 college students who attended a catwalk for HIV/AIDS awareness (Smith, Menn, Dorsett, & Wilson, 2012) . The Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) was the statistical tool used in data analysis and it was discovered that informal HIV awareness events have the ability to give accurate information without judging participants (Smith et al., 2012). A limitation of this study is that because a cross- sectional design was used in sampling 106 students, findings of the study may not be applicable to larger populations. Third Research Article This study focused on investigating the role played by the media on students’ knowledge and awareness of HIV/AIDS. Purposive sampling was used to sample 331 students to whom survey questionnaires were administered and an audiotape was used for the interviews (Khosrovani, Desai, & Sanders, 2011). Data was collected in two weeks and participants were volunteers from different age groups and gender. SPSS was the statistical tool used in data analysis (Khosrovani et al., 2011). Findings of the study were that although the students had knowledge of HIV/AIDS, 20% of them still believed that the HIV virus could be transmitted by kissing and shaking hands with infected persons or visiting public facilities. Media publications were also found effective in delivering public health messages (Khosrovani et al., 2011). The limitation of this study is that it is only focused on a generalized outlook of what the 7
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EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROPOSAL media portrays about HIV/AIDS, it failed to assess a specific media message. Also, participants were not randomly selected which increase bias but decreases validity and generalization. Fourth Research Article This study is a qualitative exploratory study that explored African American clergy’s awareness about HIV/AIDS as part of the goal of examining how these clergies promoted discussions on sexual health among couples that are getting ready to marry (Aholou, Gale, & Salter, 2011). Seven clergies were sampled which were made up of four women and three men. The interview was open-ended and semi- structured, lasting about a half hour. The interview was audio recorded and then transcribed verbatim. The findings of the study showed that the participants were generally aware of HIV/AIDS, however three of the participants who never attended HIV/AIDS workshop did not recommend HIV testing (Aholou et al., 2011). The researchers suggested the clergy would be instrumental in creating awareness about HIV/AIDS (Aholou et al., 2011). They also encouraged the clergy, clinicians, family practitioners, and the public to participate in HIV prevention workshops which they believe will increase awareness, willingness to test for HIV, and decrease anxiety associated with initiating discussions on sexuality (Aholou et al., 2011). Limitations of this study include the small sample size of only seven clergies and the inability of the researchers to determine whether the responses given by the clergy in the interview were just their perspectives or their actual practice (Aholou et al., 2011).
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