Perception differently suggests that languages may

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 3 pages.

perception differently - suggests that languages may have features that predispose speakers to - notice or ignore certain things - make certain kinds of distinctions, but not others - think in certain ways, and not others - these features include - having unusually elaborate vocabularies for certain areas of experience - the 92 Hanunoo words for different kinds of rice (assuming this is correct!) suggest that the average Hanunoo perceives more subtle differences in rice than we do - and thus has a head start in making better decisions about planting, managing, harvesting, buying, storing, cooking, etc. rice than we can - having grammars that require people to specify things often when speaking - formal vs. informal forms of address, like “tu” and “Ud.” in Spanish - presumably make Spanish speakers think more frequently about status relationships between people than English speakers do - Spanish constantly reminds you of status differences - English facilitates an illusion of equality - different ways of thinking about time
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

Anth 340.101: Living in our Globalized World F 2011 / Owen: Steckley Ch. 3 p. 2 - English grammar forces you to constantly specify whether something happened in the past, present, and future - Hopi grammar forces you to specify whether something is real (present OR past), or is hypothetical (future, wish, myth, dream, hope…) - English tenses encourage us to think of future events (expectations, plans, etc.) as equally real as ones that are ongoing or past - the sun will rise tomorrow; class will start at 6:00 -
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
You've reached the end of this preview.
  • Fall '11
  • Owen
  • Linguistic relativity, Inuit, linguistic determinism, globalized world, Steckley

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern