In the second stanza owen moves away from the war to

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In the second stanza, Owen moves away from the war to speak about the people who have been affected by it: the civilians which mourn their lost brothers, fathers, grandfathers, and uncles,the ones who wait for them to come home and wind up disappointed and miserable when they don’t. The acute loss of life that Owen witnessed in the war is made all the more poignant and heart-breaking in the second stanza, which, compared to the first, seems almost unnaturally still. He speaks about the futility of mourning the dead who have been lost so carelessly, and by makingthe mourners youthful, he draws further attention to the youthfulness of the soldiers themselves. Note the clever use of words like pallor most often associated with death or dying.Owen also frames this second stanza in the dusk. This is to signify the end, which of course for many of the soldiers it was their end. The second stanza is also considerably shorter than the first. It contains only six lines compared to the first which contains nine. The metre is far more
even in the second stanza as well. This is only subtly different but the net effect is while the first stanza creates a frenetic, disjointed feel the second is more reflective of a solemnity.The final line – ‘And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds‘ – highlights the inevitability and the quiet of the second stanza, the almost pattern-like manner of mourning that has now become a way of life. It normalizes the funeral, and hints at the idea that this is not the first, second, nor last time that such mourning will be carried out.‘Anthem for Doomed Youth’ is a sonnet divided into an octave (eight-line unit) and asestet (a six-line unit). Although such a structure is usually associated with aPetrarchan or Italian sonnet, here the rhyme scheme suggests the English or Shakespearean sonnet:ababcdcdeffegg. The one twist is in the third quatrain, which is rhymedeffe, with enclosed rhymes, rather than the more usualefef. As with Owen’s powerful use of pararhyme in his other poems (perhaps most powerfully of all inthe couplets of his poem ‘Strange Meeting’), such a twist on the established rhyme scheme is designed to wrong-footus, and remind us that nothing in this war is as it seems: the old certainties have broken down.How interesting, then, that the mechanical twisting of religious acts of devotion and respect which we are presented with in the octave should, in the sestet, be turned on its head: Owen tells us that the most sincere ‘holy glimmer’ of respect for the dead soldiers is not found in the glimmer of candles (lighted as an act of remembrance) but in the brightly shining eyes of young boys (suggestive not only of the children made fatherless orphans by the war but also of their slightly older brothers, young boys of sixteen or seventeen who hadgone off to fight in the war). The ultimate funeral pall is no sheet placed over the tombs of

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