It ends up flying through outer space forever The neutrinos behavior makes it

It ends up flying through outer space forever the

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interacting with any atoms in any way. It ends up flying through outer space forever. The neutrino's behavior makes it exceedingly difficult to detect, and when beta decay was first discovered nobody realized that neutrinos even existed. We now know that the neutrino carries off some of the energy produced in the reaction, but at the time it seemed that the total energy afterwards (not counting the unsuspected neutrino's energy) was greater than the total energy before the reaction, violating conservation of energy. Physicists were getting ready to throw conservation of energy out the window as a basic law of physics when indirect evidence led them to the conclusion that neutrinos existed. Chapter 2 The Nucleus
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61 Discussion questions A . In the reactions n p + e + ν and p n + e + + ν , verify that charge is conserved. In beta decay, when one of these reactions happens to a neutron or proton within a nucleus, one or more gamma rays may also be emitted. Does this affect conservation of charge? Would it be possible for some extra electrons to be released without violating charge conservation? B . When an antielectron and an electron annihilate each other, they produce two gamma rays. Is charge conserved in this reaction? 2.7 Fusion As we have seen, heavy nuclei tend to fly apart because each proton is being repelled by every other proton in the nucleus, but is only attracted by its nearest neighbors. The nucleus splits up into two parts, and as soon as those two parts are more than about 1 fm apart, the strong nuclear force no longer causes the two fragments to attract each other. The electrical repul- sion then accelerates them, causing them to gain a large amount of kinetic energy. This release of kinetic energy is what powers nuclear reactors and fission bombs. It might seem, then, that the lightest nuclei would be the most stable, but that is not the case. Let's compare an extremely light nucleus like 4 He with a somewhat heavier one, 16 O. A neutron or proton in 4 He can be attracted by the three others, but in 16 O, it might have five or six neighbors attracting it. The 16 O nucleus is therefore more stable. It turns out that the most stable nuclei of all are those around nickel and iron, having about 30 protons and 30 neutrons. Just as a nucleus that is too heavy to be stable can release energy by splitting apart into pieces that are closer to the most stable size, light nuclei can release energy if you stick them together to make bigger nuclei that are closer to the most stable size. Fusing one nucleus with another is called nuclear fusion. Nuclear fusion is what powers our sun and other stars. This array of gamma-ray detectors, called GAMMASPHERE, is currently housed at Argonne National Laboratory, in Illinois. During operation, the array is closed up, and a beam of ions produced by a particle accelerator strikes a target at its cen- ter, producing nuclear fusion reactions. The gamma rays can be studied for information about the structure of the fused nuclei, which are typically varieties not found in nature. The
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