There is a 375 chance of getting two questions right

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32)=3!(32)!2!×.52×.51=3×.25×.5=.375There is a 37.5% chance of getting two questions right on T3 (the third sub-exam).b)What are your overall chances of passing the entire exam?
c)What are your chances of passing T3 if you first pass T1 and T2?
Problem Hint:Structure your analysis.Figure out the component probabilities: p(passing test 1), p(passing test 2), p(passingtest 3).Make a table of their proportional contributions of probability to the whole.Calculate the total probability: p(Total).Continue using Bayes’ theorem to calculate the probability of passing test 3 conditionalon passing tests 1 and 2.Render your interpretation. Use the interpretation in the example as a template, if youare unsure of what to say.Problem 5: Now, let’s say that you know just enough of these obscure languages to translate the firstquestion in T1:What time is it? (Klingon)1.(Swahili): From dawn to setting sun. (Navajo)2.(Swahili): Flowers grow around my house (Esperanto) so all of you may come in.(Klingon)3.(Swahili): The sandwich will be eaten (Esperanto) because we are Klingons! (Klingon)4.(Swahili): It’s mid-afternoon. (Navajo)[correct answer]
Now the probability of passing T1 has changed because you only have to guess correctly on one of thetwo remaining questions in the first section, a one-in-two chance.a)What is the new probability for T1?
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Term
Fall
Professor
Deidre Jablonski
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