premier site for business and financial market news The Gas Is Always Greener

Premier site for business and financial market news

This preview shows page 31 - 32 out of 55 pages.

[premier site for business and financial market news, " The Gas Is Always Greener When It Leaks  Less," 6/13/12, - it-leaks-less.html]//SH The  great  promise of natural gas , we’re often told,  is that it will be better for the climate than  other fossil fuels.  In fact,  this can come true only if very little of the fuel is allowed to  escape , unburned, into the air.  The trouble is, we don’t know how much natural gas leaks  -- as it is  extracted, processed, transported and used --  and  some  evidence suggests the amount may be more than  we have assumed . As the U.S. gears up to use more of the fuel, not only for electricity and home heating but also to  power cars and trucks and for export, the need to find out how much is getting away is urgent. This is exactly what experts  convened by the Department of Energy recommended last August. So far, their call has gone unanswered.  The reason  natural gas has a reputation for being gentle on the climate is that burning it emits  almost a third less carbon dioxide  than burning oil does, and almost 45 percent less than burning coal does . But when methane, the principal component of natural gas, floats directly into the air, it has a much stronger greenhouse effect  than carbon dioxide has -- 25 times stronger over the course of a century and,  over 20 years,  72 times stronger . (The time span makes a difference because methane breaks down in the atmosphere  faster than carbon dioxide does.)  The maximum leakage we can afford is 3.2 percent  of the total amount  of natural gas used, scientists from the Environmental Defense Fund and three universities recently figured out. Any more than  that, and using natural gas leads to more heat being trapped in the atmosphere for some time than using coal does. The best  guess so far on how much is leaking is just 2.4 percent. However, this number, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is based not on direct measurements but on limited data collected 20 years ago.  Recent measurements  taken near a  natural-gas field north of Denver  indicate that the actual amount of methane escaping  there  is  higher --  about 4 percent . This study determined leakage by sampling the air in the vicinity of natural-gas facilities, which is a more accurate way of assessing leakage. Yet it would be better to monitor methane directly at the points where it is escaping.  Environmental Defense Fund scientists are taking such measurements now at select drilling sites in four big natural- gas- producing regions in the U.S. Eventually, they plan to take similar readings on leaks from transmission pipes and storage 
Image of page 31
Image of page 32

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 55 pages?

  • Winter '20
  • The Land, immigration reform, Global Forest Coalition, Startup Act, new forest land

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes