References Westfall R S 2016 February 24 Isaac Newton Retrieved

References westfall r s 2016 february 24 isaac newton

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References: Westfall, R. S. (2016, February 24). Isaac Newton. Retrieved May 01, 2016, from Iaccarino, M. (n.d.). Science and Ethics: As Research and Technology Are Changing Society and theWay We Live, Scientists Can No Longer Claim that Science is Neutral but Must Consider the Ethical and Social Aspects of Their Work. Retrieved May 01, 2016, from Burnett, T. (2013). What is Scientism? Retrieved May 01, 2016, from -scientism Digital Technology as a Two-Edged SwordIt’s hard to identify any technological advance that has not had both positive and negative effects. A famous example is the discovery of penicillin. That first antibiotic greatly reduced the fatality rate in World War II. Penicillin soon led to the development and application of a host of new and effective antibiotics. That’s the bright side. On the downside, the overuse of antibiotics created unanticipated consequences. All life forms tend to adopt to changes in their environment, including bacterial pathogens. As the use of antibiotics increased, the targeted pathogens adapted. The surviving bacteria mutated into antibiotic pathogens–“super bugs”–that are immune to antibiotics.It’s not all that surprising that, in ethical and moral terms, digital-electronic technologies generally have an upside and a downside. Here are some examples.Industrial Efficiency. Since the advent of computers and electronic communications, industries of all kinds have seen an amazing growth in productivity. However, at the same time, wages for workers have either declined or remained stagnant. The profits related to greater efficiency have mainly gravitated to the wealthy.As more and more work stations feature computers, more accurate quantification permits industrial supervisors and managers to closely monitor worker efficiency. But that reality has side effects. Workers’ privacy has all but vanished. In some cases efforts to expedite call center worker efficiency have required workers to take a minimum number of bathroom breaks at specified times.Phone mazeshave become commonplace for all kinds of organizations. Presumably, the mazes increase organization efficiency. But according to Deseret News(way back in 1994!), callers dealing with automated phone response systems feel like “rats in a maze.” The business objective of phone mazes is reducing the need to hire additional employees, thus adding to higher rates of unemployment.Source: Valaskovic, S. (1994, January 28). High-Tech Phone Systems Make Callers Feel Like Rats in a Maze. Retrieved May 01, 2016, from - PHONE-SYSTEMS-MAKE-CALLERS-FEEL-LIKE-RATS-IN-A-MAZE.html?pg=all If you do, at long last, reach an actual human being, be prepared for that perennial warning: “This call may be monitored for quality assurance” or something similar.
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