communication between two neurons communication between neurons occurs at

Communication between two neurons communication

This preview shows page 4 - 8 out of 10 pages.

communication between two neurons (communication between neurons occurs at synapse) Left Hemisphere: Math, Logic, Language Right Hemisphere: Music, Metaphors, Visual-spatial relations
Image of page 4
- Temporal lobes: auditory cortex & Wernicke’s area (hearing) - Occipital lobes: visual cortex (seeing) - Parietal lobes: somatosensory cortex (sensing), spatial orientation - Frontal lobes: Broca’s area Exam 3 People: John Watson – Emotional conditioning Thorndike – Law of Effect Skinner – Operant Conditioning Bandura – Observational Learning Perceptual Organization: Gestalt psychology – Wertheimer, Koffka, Kohler Similarity: similar things appear to be grouped together Proximity: things that are near to each other appear to be grouped together Closure: missing parts of an object are filled in to complete it, so that it appears as a whole Figure-ground: as we view the world, some objects often seem to stand out from the background Continuity: lines tend to be seen as continuous, even if they are interrupted Common fate: things that are moving in the same direction appear to be grouped together Hearing: Outer ear – - Pinna(e) - Auditory (Ear) canal - Ear drum (Tympanic membrane): border between outer & middle ear Middle ear – - Ossicle: amplifies sound waves - hammer: closest to tympanic membrane - anvil - stirrups: closest to oval window & cochlea
Image of page 5
- Oval window: border between middle & inner ear Inner ear – Cochlea - Basilar membrane: base responds best to high frequencies and apex responds best to low frequencies - Hair cells: sensory neurons for hearing Auditory nerve: transmits electrical impulses from hair cells to brain Eye: Rods: allow us to see in dark or dimly lit conditions Cones: allow us to see color and detail Bipolar cells: neurons in the eye that conduct neural impulses from rods and cones to ganglion cells Ganglion cells: neurons in the eye whose axons form the optic nerve Cornea: tough, transparent, protective layer covering the front of the eye and performs the first step in vision by bending light rays inward Lens: composed of many thin layers & looks like a transparent disc, performs the tas of focusing on viewed objects Iris: a muscular membrane whose dilation regulates the amount of light that enters the eye Pupil: the black-looking opening in the center of the iris through which light enters the eye Fovea: an area near the center of the retina that is dense with cones and where vision is consequently most acute Retina: a layer of tissue located at the back of the eye that contains the sensory neurons for vision Top-down processing: use of contextual information or knowledge of a pattern in order to organize parts of the pattern Bottom-up processing: organization of the parts of a pattern to recognize or form an image of the pattern they compose
Image of page 6
Classical Conditioning: Extinction: weakening or eventual disappearance of the CR as a result of repeated presentations of the CS without the UCS (ringing the bell, but not giving food) Spontaneous recovery: reoccurrence of an extinguished response when an organism is exposed to the original CS following a rest period Generalization:
Image of page 7
Image of page 8

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 10 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes