ch04

Psychology in Action

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Instructor’s Resource Guide                              Chapter 4                                            Page   131                                                                            
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H andout 4.1 – Active Learning SPIRAL ILLUSION Instructor’s Resource Guide                              Chapter 4                                            Page   132                                                                            
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Active Learning Activity 4.2 - The Difference Between Rods and Cones In this simple demonstration of the differences between rods and cones, first have the class form groups of two individuals. Have one student become the subject and the other the experimenter. The experimenter stands behind the subject and chooses a brightly colored item (pen, pencil or ruler). The experimenter instructs the subject to fixate on a distant point. Then the experimenter moves the object slowly from behind the head into the peripheral vision. If this movement is slow enough, the students will detect the object before the subject can determine the color. Have the students switch their roles and repeat the demonstration. Active Learning Activity 4.3 - Hole in the Hand Retinal disparity can be demonstrated by the “hole in the hand” illusion. Ask each student to roll sheets of paper into tubes, and, while holding the tubes in their left hands, look through them with their left eyes. Then ask them to place their right hands to the right of the tube, next to the far end. When students look far away with both eyes, they will see a “hole” through their right hand. The brain, unable to reconcile the different views coming from the two eyes, chooses to see through the hand and out of the tube. Active Learning Activity 4.4 - Ocular Dominance Have each student in class raise their hands and point toward your head with his or her finger. Instruct them to shut one eye and then the other, while they continue pointing at you with their outstretched arm. Ask which eye “shifted” the most? Students who are right-eye dominant will experience little eye shifting when they shut their left eye, while those who are left-eye dominant will experience little shifting when they shut their right eye. Explain that both eyes are receiving the same stimulation and sending the same information to the brain, but the brain is only using the information for the dominant eye. Ask why. What is the evolutionary advantage? Further explain that about 65 % of the population is right-eye dominant while the remaining 35% is left-eye dominant.
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