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601_Introduction_to_Graduate_Education_Hall_7

Logical fallacies types ad hoc argument from

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Logical Fallacies Types Ad hoc Argument from ignorance Ad hominem (attacking the person) Appeal to authority Appeal to emotion Begging the question False analogy Slippery slope 25
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Logical Fallacies Types (cont.) Common belief Division Composition False dilemma or false dichotomy Hasty generalization Inconsistency Non sequitur 26
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Logical Fallacies Types (cont.) Red Herring Straw man Two wrongs make a right Slanting 27
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Limitations All logic has limitations Sound reasoning from a Christian Worldview may supersede secular logic May be logical from God’s perspective but not the world 28
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Conclusion Hall Seven Importance of critical thinking Perspectives Assumptions and biases Sound reasoning Deductive verses inductive reasoning Logical fallacies 29
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References Angelo, T. A. (1995). Beginning the dialogue: Thoughts on promoting critical thinking: Classroom assessment for critical thinking. Teaching of Psychology, 22(1), 6-7. Halpern, D. (1998). Teaching critical thinking for transfer across domains. Dispositions, skills, structure training, and metacognitive monitoring. American Psychologist, 53(4), 449- 455. 30
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References Kirby, G. R. & Goodpaster, J. R. (1999). Thinking. (3 rd . ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Scriven, M. & Paul, R. (1996). Defining Critical Thinking: A Draft Statement for the National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking. 31
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