I choose explicit instruction for the whole group to activate prior knowledge

I choose explicit instruction for the whole group to

This preview shows page 8 - 10 out of 17 pages.

I choose explicit instruction for the whole group to activate prior knowledge and to be able to model or scaffold how to determine the main idea of a text vs. a topic. I wanted to gradually release students based off of their previous knowledge and new gain knowledge from the whole group instruction. Research proves that explicit instruction and gradual release of responsibility increases comprehension (McLaughlin, 2012). 8
A Balanced Literacy Lesson Plan I included cooperative learning to simulate a real-life experience. Most careers involve working cooperatively with others to achieve a common goal. According to the Washington Post, “For successful transfer to occur to non-classroom situations, they recommend that schools place a greater emphasis on shared learning” (2015). I will also allow for individual work to see how much understanding each student has taken away, which will allow me to determine who needs more instruction and what that instruction will look like. I will create partners with a name generator. I believe that students need should experience working with others at their ability level or below or above. This will create partnerships, in which, students will be able to play a role of coach, the person being coached, or team players. What levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy did your students reach? 1. Students will match the definitions of Main Idea, Supporting Details, and Topic to their definitions. The task is a basic recall of information; students must remember definitions and match them to the vocabulary word (Bloom’s Taxonomy- Knowledge). 2. Students will identify the definitions of main idea, supporting details, and topic. According to Walden University, “identifying” is a verb used to address the comprehension level of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Guide for Writing Learning Objectives, n.d.). 3. Students will need to be able to understand the difference between main idea, supporting details and topics. Then students need to describe the differences. This is the comprehension level of Bloom’s Taxonomy. 4. After reading a non-fiction text, 80% of students will be able to interpret the main idea, topic, and supporting details of the text. This is the application level of Bloom’s Taxonomy. 5. After reading a non-fiction text, 80% of students will be able to produce a sentence stating the main idea of the text. This is the analysis level of Bloom’s Taxonomy. 6. After reading a nonfiction text, students will compose a summary paragraph that includes the main idea and two or more supporting details of a nonfiction text. Students will need to use their knowledge of the main idea to write supporting detail sentences that relate to the main idea. This objective also meets Bloom’s synthesis level. 7. Upon reading a nonfiction text, students will compose a summary paragraph that includes the main idea and two supporting details. Students reading the same passage will compare their summaries. This learning objective meets Bloom’s synthesis and evaluation levels.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture