Genetics twin studies estimate that up to 75 an and

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Genetics Twin studies estimate that up to 75% (AN) and 83% (BN) of contributing factors are accounted for by genetics Also high heritability (49-66%) for disordered eating a itudes and behaviors Hypothalamus Area of the brain that is responsible for appetite and weight control Ventromedial hypothalamus-responsible for inhibiting appetite and food intake Lateral hypothalamus-responsible for increasing appetite and food intake
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Neurotransmi ers Nerve cells in the brain use neurotransmi ers to send messages to each other Dopamine: involved in both an increase and decrease in appetite depending upon location in the brain, reinforcement and reward Serotonin: involved in anxiety, obsessions, impulse control, and regulation of mood and appetite Serotonin and ED Over production of serotonin and AN May explain restricting behaviors BN and binge eating disorder and low production of serotonin May explain binge behavior Brain Disturbance of hedonic pathways AN: Li le hedonic response to food or there is a rapid development of satiety BN: may have exaggerated hedonic response to food or li le development of satiety, so that over-eating follows. Personality Type
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Childhood Temperament & Personality Traits People-pleasing Con ict-Avoidant Perfectionism Inhibition Drive for thinness Altered interoceptive awareness Obsessive-compulsive personality traits All Traits Precede onset Persist a er recovery Heritable Food Messages Morality of Eating Indulge vs. restrain Guilt-free eating Eve ate. Dietary Guidelines Moderation Flexibility Variety Usability
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Life Experiences Moving, New School Loss of a Relationship Death of a loved one Witnessing trauma Onset of puberty (40 lbs in 4 years) Major transition-separation/individuation/identity Onset of co-morbid illnesses (anxiety/depression) Innocent weight loss or increased exercise Common Precipitants Trauma Abuse Sexual, physical, emotional Teasing Bullying Parent’s Divorce Eating Disorders Help... Cope Adapt Decrease anxiety and depression Ignore feelings of sadness or loss Control Work through identity issues and stress Avoid the real problem
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Re ection Ideas: Food messages at home or in your environment? Morality of Eating?
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