The Pancreas The pancreas is a triangular organ that lies between the stomach

The pancreas the pancreas is a triangular organ that

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The Pancreas The pancreas is a triangular organ that lies between the stomach and the first part of the small intestine. Like the liver, the pancreas plays a role in many body processes. As part of the digestive system, the pancreas produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine and help break down starches, proteins, and fats. Digestive enzymes do not break down all food substances. Recall that the fiber in food isn’t broken down. Instead, fiber thickens the liquid material in the intestine. This thickening makes it easier for peristalsis to push the material forward. After chemical digestion takes place, the small nutrient molecules are ready to be absorbed by the body. The structure of the small intestine makes it well suited for absorption. The inner surface, or lining, of the small intestine looks bumpy. Millions of tiny finger-shaped structures called villi (vil eye) (singular villus) cover the surface. The villi absorb nutrient molecules. Notice in Figure 17 that tiny blood vessels run through the center of each villus. Nutrient molecules pass from cells on the surface of a villus into blood vessels. The blood carries the nutrients throughout the body for use by body cells. Absorption in the Small Intestine Villi greatly increase the surface area of the small intestine. If all the villi were laid out flat, the total surface area of the small intestine would be about as large as a tennis court. This increased surface enables digested food to be absorbed much faster than if the walls of the small intestine were smooth. The Large Intestine By the time material reaches the end of the small intestine, most nutrients have been absorbed. The remaining material moves from the small intestine into the large intestine. The large intestine is the last section of the digestive system. It is about 1.5 meters long—about as long as the average bathtub. It runs up the right-hand side of the abdomen, across the upper abdomen, and then down the left-hand side. The large intestine contains bacteria that feed on the material passing through. These bacteria normally do not cause disease. In fact, they are helpful because they make certain vitamins, including vitamin K. The material entering the large intestine contains water and undigested food. As the material moves through the large intestine, water is absorbed into the bloodstream. The remaining material is readied for elimination from the body. The large intestine ends in a short tube called the rectum. Here, waste material is compressed into a solid form. This waste material is eliminated from the body through the anus, a muscular opening at the end of the rectum.
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  • Fall '10
  • KATIECLARK
  • large  intestine

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