Be heading for a transfer station incinerator

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be heading for a transfer station, incinerator, processing plant, or sanitary land fill (Nathanson, J. A., & Schneider, R. A., 2015). Every aspect is designed to be time and cost effective, around here most collection trucks last stop is a transfer station. Transfer stations may seem to be a wasted step along the process of solid waste management but they are indeed crucial. The purpose of transfer stations is to be a facility at which solid waste from individual collection trucks are consolidated into larger vehicles such as tractor-trailer units (Nathanson, J. A., & Schneider, R. A., 2015) it has been argued that transfer stations only cost more money when in fact they are more economical. The use of transfer stations, reduce fuel cost for collection trucks since semi and trailer units can go further on the same amount of fuel, as well as reduce cost of wear and tear and maintenance needs. There are two types of transfer stations. The first is a direct discharge in which each truck unloads directly into a larger transport vehicle which when compacted can hold the same amount of eight individual collection trucks (Nathanson, J. A., & Schneider, R. A., 2015). The second type is a storage discharge in which refuse is emptied from collection trucks into storage pits or large platforms where its is then loaded or pushed into larger trailer units (Nathanson, J. A., & Schneider, R. A., 2015). Once the refuse is collected it is transferred for treatment or disposal. A common method of disposal is incineration. Incineration has been proven to reduce the volume of refuse by 90% and the weight by 75% (Nathanson, J. A., & Schneider, R. A., 2015). The more that refuse can be reduced the less that ends up in a landfill which is better for public, and environmental health and safety. Incineration has some drawbacks as well as benefits.
UNIT IV ESSAY 5 Incineration can be expensive due to the required air pollution control equipment. Also, bottom and fly ash can be toxic when inhaled (Nathanson, J. A., & Schneider, R. A., 2015). The benefits of incineration are that the ash can be chemically or physically treated prior to disposal to aid in decomposition and even sometimes can be reused in things like road construction (Nathanson, J. A., & Schneider, R. A., 2015). Incineration is just one form of waste disposal there are several options that municipalities use.

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