Guidelines roofs should demonstrate a common sense

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GUIDELINES Roofs should demonstrate a common-sense recognition of the climate, utilizing appropriate pitch, drainage, and materials. Study local lines of sight, and locate rooftop mechanical equipment to minimize views of the equipment from the street and from other buildings, existing and future. Integrate screening devices into the roof design. Remove unused equipment from roofs. When a flat roof is screened with a parapet or mansard roof on any facade, the parapet or mansard roof should extend around the remaining facades that are visible from the street. Consider rooftop stormwater management systems. “Green” roofs can incorporate gardens and terraces. When solar panels, wind turbines, and other alternative energy devices are designed as integral parts of the architecture buildings and roofs, such elements need not be hidden from view. LDR STANDARDS 10-283.(c)(4)d.3. Commercial buildings and buildings with ground floor commercial uses shall have minimum twelve (12) feet high ceilings at the ground floor. 10-283.(c)(8)a.3. Long, monotonous roof planes and uninterrupted expanses of blank wall are not allowed along street frontages. Articulated roof forms and wall openings shall be used to add visual interest and contribute to a human scale. Parking levels shall be included when measuring building height. See the Tallahassee Land Development Regulations for the complete standards. New York The view of a roof from above is often overlooked. ASLA Headquarters, Washington DC A green roof that screens mechanical equipment.
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D E S I G N R E V I E W D I S T R I C T S A L L D I S T R I C T S BU I L D I N G D E S I G N T a l l a h a s s e e - L e o n C o u n t y P l a n n i n g D e p a r t m e n t 3.b. G A I N E S S T R E E T ´¶ 3.b.4. Facades A vibrant public realm depends on the relationships of buildings and sidewalks. Facades should reflect historical urban patterns, or establish desirable new ones; reinforce human scale; blend new development with existing urban fabric; and entertain the pedestrian’s eye. On a building’s lower stories, facade elements such as entrances, windows, awnings, canopies, lighting, and signs, bring human scale to building masses, protect pedestrians from the weather, and convey a sense of safety at night. Facades with few openings sever pedestrians’ connections with buildings, deaden streets, invite crime and graffiti. Facades are appreciated one way by people near them at street level, another way among other facades that make up the street face, and again from up in other buildings, where the view gathers facades, roofs, building masses, and the street into a three- dimensional composition. Different vantage points offer different appreciations of a design.
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