Nothing gold can stay mending wall swayed in tone

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Nothing Gold Can Stay Mending Wall swayed in tone throughout the story. In the beginning he agrees with the neighbor who says “...good fences make good neighbors...” (Frost). However, after that first statement, he questions it using rhetorical statements, ¨Why do they make good neighbours? Isn't it / Where there are cows? / But here there are no cows. / Before I built a wall I'd ask to know,¨ (Frost). In Nothing Gold Can Stay , you can see a similar shift. In the beginning, Frost uses personification in describing the beauty of early buds “Nature’s first green is gold, / Her hardest hue to hold…” (Frost). Then, he switches tone at “but only so an hour,” (Frost), and sinks into a dreary tone using imagery “So Eden sank to grief, / So dawn goes down to day,” (Frost). Both stories provide great lessons and thoughts to chew on, and Frost masterfully does so using different forms of figurative language, making them the timeless classics they are. ,
2. Short-response prompt (15 points) Read the following excerpt from chapter 21 of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath: And the smell of rot fills the country. Burn coffee for fuel in the ships. Burn corn to keep warm, it makes a hot fire. Dump potatoes in the rivers and place guards along the banks to keep the hungry people from fishing them out. Slaughter the pigs and bury them, and let the putrescence drip down into the earth.

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