Expository speech a presentation expressing a particular theory belief or

Expository speech a presentation expressing a

This preview shows page 21 - 23 out of 29 pages.

Expository speech: a presentation expressing a particular theory belief or contextJargon: technical language specific to a particular group or profession that is not typically understood by the general public.Description: a technique that depicts the attributes of an entity or idea with clarify and detail.Personalize: to utilize a perspective that encourages identification with ideas presented in term of one’s own experience.The Psychology of PersuasionBelieve it or not, effective persuasionrequires that you be part psychologist. Of all the speeches you might give, persuasive speeches will test your skills more than any other.Why, you ask? Consider these examples: to inform an audience of motorcyclists of laws regarding mets, but it is much more difficult to convince them to helmets. It is easy to explain to an audience the positive changes your low-income rebuilding progbrought to the community. You’ll face a tougher task persuading listeners to actually writas a donation to your program. Informative speeches don’t ask anything of the audience. Persuasive speeches expect some sort of action or attitude change. If you think getting people to donate money is rough, try getting them to give up a long-held belief rooted firmly in their values.
Background image
The Unspoken InterchangeHere are the two primary reasons that persuasive speaking can be so difficult: Because it is so difficult, you need to approach a persuasive speech realistically. If your audience holds strongly opposing opinions, you may need to redefine success. Maybe your goal should be to aim for winning over only a small portion of your audience. Audiences Are Active ListenersPart of the psychology of persuasive public speaking involves the interchange between you and your listeners. This is not actual dialogue, but rather the mental dialogue, or give-and-take, that occurs during the speech.Sound confusing? Think of it this way: Audiences are not passive recipients, like bread sopping up gravy. Instead, listeners are more like bread yeast, actively taking in your words and acting on them in their minds. They integrate your words into their mind frames by incorporating, assessing, and evaluating all that you say. Basically, they’re sizing you up by assessing elements such as the following: Listeners may even argue with you silently, composing rebuttals! Prepare to RespondHow should you handle this psychological component going on beyond the podium? The most skillful and experienced public speakers understand this unspoken “other side” of the speech—and they work with it.You can do this as well. Use the following techniques: Gauging potential audience reaction will prepare you for the day of your speech. Ethical Persuasion GuidelinesJust because you want to persuade your audience doesn’t mean you can use any and all means to reach your goal. You must be ethical! Though ethicsare often dependent on your personal values or morals, there are some general guidelines you should follow: Ethical Persuasion Guidelines, continuedHere are a few more guidelines for ethical persuasion:Beware of quoting people out of context to manufacture support for your views. It is unethical to discredit
Background image
Image of page 23

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 29 pages?

  • Spring '08
  • any
  • oral reports

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture