Medea alas loves a miserable thing for mortal men 390

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Medea: “Alas, love’s a miserable thing for mortal men.” (390-391) Foreshadowing – Euripides makes Medea's path of revenge clear from the opening of the play. The audience, however, would have been familiar with her story already Though Medea is exiled from Corinth after Jason took a new bride, she has really been exiled for much longer, after helping Jason gain the throne of Iolcus by chopping up the previous king. Medea is still perceived as an outsider (she is originally from Colchis), despite her Greek husband and sons. Her drive for revenge against those who isolate her may be a cause of her actions. This quote shows how Jason’s actions are not uncommon, but Medea’s reaction is. The Chorus attempts to explain this to Medea, however they are later more amenable to her side. This betrayal is the single act that is responsible for the ensuing tragedy in the play. His actions raise the question of how much blame is on him and on Medea for the deaths it the play Euripides understands how females are disadvantaged in society, especially during ancient times, and makes that a central theme in this play Creon explains that he is banishing Medea from Corinth because she is knowledgeable in the ways of witchcraft and sorcery. He does not want to have those around that may have power over him. Medea recognizes that her passionate love for Jason is what has caused her this trouble in the first place. Her passion has now been turned to revenge. 2
Page Novel Chart Characters Name Role in the story Significance Adjectives Nurse Tutor Medea Jason Glauke Creon Chorus Aegeus The Sons Medea’s servant Children’s servant/teacher Wife of Jason, protagonist Husband of Medea Jason’s new wife King of Corinth A group of Corinthian women King of Athens Medea and Jason’s two sons Summarizes events leading up to start of play, comments on interactions that happen afterwards Reacts to the drama between Medea and Jason, similar to the nurse, but with a differing perspective Seeks revenge for husband’s ‘betrayal’, kills, Creon, Glauke, and her two sons to that end Betrays Medea by leaving her for Glauke, a Corinthian princess, attempts to pacify Medea, cannot save children from death Aspires to keep Medea out of Corinth, main object of Medea’s jealousy Allows Medea temporary reprieve in Corinth, embraces his daughter even though it kills them both Reacting to events and narrating between scenes, originally condemn Medea but later understand her plight Grants Medea safe passage in exchange for cure of fertility, provides the means for Medea to carry out her plan Are killed as a result of Medea’s drive for revenge against their father. Shows the extent to which Medea desires to hurt Jason for his betrayal Canny, powerless, torn between duty to Medea and sons, sympathetic to Medea sympathetic to Jason Cunning, jealous, dutiful, manipulative, proud, passionate Self-interested, unsympathetic, weak, opportunistic, condescending Young and beautiful, Doesn’t speak much in the play Shrewd, forgiving, fearful Reactive, idealistic, powerless Oblivious Pawns, pitiable 3
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