Emergency Preparedness in Schools

Emergency preparedness plans and using school

Info icon This preview shows pages 18–21. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
emergency preparedness plans, and using school buildings to shelter community members during emergencies. National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Education, School and Teaching Resources. (2002). Biodefense: A need for public understanding and the critical role of science teachers and a teacher curriculum supplement: Emerging and
Image of page 18

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
19 re-emerging infectious diseases. - education.nih.gov/biodefenseinsert/ Gives suggestions on how teachers can explain how health decisions are made, explain the role of vaccination in public health and safety, and address student concerns about bioterrorism and how they can protect themselves. Applies specifically to high school educators but may be of broader interest to others . New York State Department of Education. Comprehensive Health and Pupil Student Services/Student Support Services, Regional School and Community Resources website. webpage.htm#Welcome%20to%20the%20School%20Safety%20WebPage. Site provides information in accordance with New York State recommendations on school safety plans, violent incident reporting systems, codes of conduct, child abuse, Project SAVE, training opportunities, finger printing, and related resources and links. Task Force on School Violence (1999). Safer Schools for the 21st Century: A Common Sense Approach to Keep New York's Students and Schools Safe . Retrieved August 19, 2003 from Provides a report by New York State task force and Governor Pataki’s office. Topics include indicators of school violence, task force recommendations, comprehensive school planning, state prevention and intervention initiatives, school crime tracking/reporting/information sharing, and expanding local authority and initiatives to promote enhanced school safety. Thornton, T. N., Craft, C. A., Dahlberg, L. L., Lynch, B. S., & Baer, K. (2000). Best practices of youth violence prevention: A sourcebook for community action . Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Retrieved August 19, 2003 from Explores the effectiveness of specific violence prevention practices in four key areas: parents and families; home visiting; social and conflict resolution skills; and mentoring. Programs are drawn from real-world experiences of advocates and professionals who have successfully worked to prevent violence among children and adolescents. As a CDC publication, the sourcebook also documents the science behind each best practice and offers a comprehensive directory of resources for more information about programs that have used these practices. United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect . School based child maltreatment programs: Synthesis of lessons learned.
Image of page 19
20 Site provides information on identification of child maltreatment, primary
Image of page 20

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 21
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern