The number of states requiring all three settings to be smoke free climbed from

The number of states requiring all three settings to

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The number of states requiring all three settings to be smoke free climbed from three to twelve. The number of states with no restrictions on any of the three settings decreased from sixteen to eight.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “State Smoking Restrictions for Private- Sector Worksites, Restaurants, and Bars—United States, 2004 and 2007,” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWRs) (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, May 23, 2008), mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5720a3.htm#content_area (accessed November 12, 2011); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “New Study Shows Tobacco Control Programs Cut Adult Smoking Rates” (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, January 30, 2008), r080130.htm?s_cid=mediarel_r080130_x (accessed November 12, 2011). Connecticut law, for example, restricts smoking in most workplaces with at least five employees to specially ventilated smoking rooms.Saul Spigel, “Statewide Smoking Ban,” OLR Research , June 9, 2003, 2003-R-0466.htm (accessed November 12, 2011). In addition, we shouldn’t underestimate the role played by business itself in the campaign to curb workplace smoking. In Connecticut, for example, the workplace smoking ban applies only to indoor areas, but many companies in the state take advantage of a provision allowing them to ban smoking anywhere on their properties. Businesses, of course, aren’t motivated strictly by civic responsibility. Workplace smoking increases employer costs in numerous ways. Smokers are absent from work 50 percent more often than nonsmokers, and they have twice as many accidents. Smoke-free firms often pay 25 percent to 35 percent less for health and fire insurance, and one government report calculates that U.S. businesses could save from $4 billion to $8 billion annually in building operations and maintenance costs if workplace smoking bans were enforced nationwide.“Smoking in the Workplace Costs Employers Money” (Washington, DC: Action on Smoking and Health, 2005), (accessed November 12, 2011); American Lung Association, “Smoking Policies in the Workplace Fact Sheet.” , (accessed November 11, 2011). And last but not least, both for-profit and nonprofit organizations must always contend with lawsuits:See E. L. Sweda Jr., “Lawsuits and Secondhand Smoke,” Chapter 16 The Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business 16.5 Some Principles of Public Law 922
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Tobacco Control (London: BMJ Publishing Group, 2004), (accessed November 12, 2011). A man suffering from asthma repeatedly asked Olympic Airways flight attendants to change his seat because of persistent secondhand smoke. They refused, he died, and his widow sued the airline for negligence. A U.S. District Court awarded the plaintiff damages of $1.4 million.
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