Aslargestableshipscameintousemarinersincreasinglyentrustedth...

This preview shows page 60 - 63 out of 76 pages.

As large, stable ships came into use, mariners increasingly entrusted their crafts and cargoes to the  reasonably predictable monsoons and sailed directly across the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal. In  the age of sail, it was impossible to make a round trip across the entire Indian Ocean without spending  months at distant ports waiting for the winds to change, so merchants usually conducted their trade in  stages.  
MAP  15.2 The trading world of the Indian Ocean basin, 600–1600  C.E. Note the directions of  seasonal winds in the Indian Ocean basin. How would mariners take advantage of these winds to reach their destinations? Click here to view the interactive version of this map Page 321 Emporia Because India stood in the middle of the Indian Ocean basin, it was a natural site  for  emporia and warehouses. Merchants coming from east Africa or Persia exchanged their cargoes at  Cambay, Calicut, or Quilon for goods to take back west with the winter monsoon. Mariners from China or  southeast Asia called at Indian ports and traded their cargoes for goods to ship east with the summer  monsoon. Merchants also built emporia outside India: the storytelling mariner Buzurg ibn Shahriyar came  from the emporium of Siraf on the Persian Gulf, a port city surrounded by desert that nevertheless  enjoyed fabulous wealth because of its trade with China, India, and east Africa. Because of their central  location, however, Indian ports became the principal clearinghouses of trade in the Indian Ocean basin,  and they became remarkably cosmopolitan centers. Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims, Jews, and others who  inhabited the Indian port cities did business with counterparts from all over the eastern hemisphere and  swapped stories like those recounted by Buzurg ibn Shahriyar. In combination, the sea lanes and emporia of the Indian Ocean basin made up a network of maritime Silk Roads—a web of transportation,  communication, and exchange that complemented the land-based Silk Roads and promoted interaction  between peoples throughout much of the eastern hemisphere. Particularly after the establishment of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties in southwest Asia and the  Tang and Song dynasties in China, trade in the Indian Ocean surged. Indian merchants and mariners  sometimes traveled to distant lands in search of marketable goods, but the carrying trade between India  and points west fell mostly into Arab and Persian hands. During the Song dynasty, Chinese junks also 
ventured into the western Indian Ocean and called at ports as far away as east Africa. In the Bay of  Bengal and the China seas, Malay and Chinese vessels were most prominent.   One of many stelae (elaborately carved obelisks) in the city of Axum in modern-day Ethiopia. The stelae were royal  grave markers that were probably erected during the fourth century  C .

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture