Rock Schwartz 2006 use neuroscience to explain why people have such a hard time

Rock schwartz 2006 use neuroscience to explain why

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Rock & Schwartz (2006), use neuroscience to explain why people have such a hard time with change. They write that “managers who understand the recent breakthroughs in cognitive science can lead and influence mindful change: organizational transformation that takes into account the physiological nature of the brain, and the ways in which it predisposes people to resist some forms of leadership and accept others” (Rock & Schwartz, 2006). They go on to explain several conclusions from their studies: change can be quite painful for many individuals and causes physiological discomfort, as it is human tendency to do what we know. Change efforts based on incentive and threat are rarely successful. In practice, the typical empathic approach of connection and persuasion doesn’t engage employees sufficiently. The act of real engagement and attention creates chemical and physical changes in our brains. A person’s expectations shape their perceived reality. Repeated, purposeful, and focused attention can lead
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Haller Specialty Manufacturing to long-lasting personal evolution (Rock & Schwartz, 2006). Much like driving a car without really thinking about it, people often go about their work day in the same way. We get comfortable in our roles, and we learn what is expected of us. Implementing any change, such as a project management position at Haller, could cause real physiological distress for the VP of Manufacturing. Trying to change any hardwired habit requires a lot of effort and attention. “This often leads to a feeling that many people find uncomfortable. So, they do what they can to avoid change” (Rock & Schwartz, 2006). Rock & Schwartz suggest that the key to getting people on board with change is to encourage them to find the solution, rather than focusing on the problem. In the case of Haller, project management is the solution for the goal of getting closer to the customers, so that is what all the employees should be focusing on rather than the daunting task of the impending project management implementation. Feedback Loop As suggested by Prosci's 3 Phase Change Management Process, during phase three the change should be reinforced, and feedback should be collected. “Evaluating this feedback allows you to identify gaps and manage the resistance that may still be occurring” (Five Tips for Managing Resistance, n.d.). This type of feedback would help to understand who is having an issue with the change, and why. Figuring out “what the holdup is” and who is having an issue with the implementation will let the project know who may need some assistance in acclimating to new policies or procedures. If employees make it known what part of the process is giving them a hard time, then the project manager or another functional manager may be able to help them see all the solutions that the change is providing.
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  • Spring '18
  • Jennifer Fleming
  • Case Study, MBA, Projectmanagement, best practices, pRM, PRM522

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